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Old October 13, 2014   #1
Misfit
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Default Daikon Radish

An old family friend gave me two types of daikon she received from her brother in Japan. No names other than Summer and Winter. Red and black seed respectively.

To make a long story short I lost all of the black seed in the wind except for one. So I've been growing that one radish hoping to save the seed after it bolts.

The thing is huge right now and showing no signs of flowering at close to 5 months old.
Is there anything I can do to hurry this process along?

-Jimmy
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Old October 14, 2014   #2
Darren Abbey
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I'm not sure about how to hurry it along. It may not want to bloom this year, as it the climate where it came from may be sufficiently different.

The resulting radish can be saved and planted inside, or saved for re-planting next year. As long as the radish doesn't dry out (perhaps by storing in a plastic baggie), it should remain viable for an extended time.

I collected seeds from a green daikon purchased from a local grocer using this method. I didn't have room to store the entire radish, so I only stored the top four inches. I planted the radish top a few weeks later when my area had warmed up. It grew leaves and eventually flowers, producing enough seeds for me to try growing it the more standard way. The tuber won't grow, but new roots will grow from the exposed vascular tissue.

Last edited by Darren Abbey; October 14, 2014 at 02:13 PM.
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Old October 14, 2014   #3
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Plant it in the house under a bright light and play with the time the light is on.
This should force the thing to bolt.
I have no idea what I am talking about it would be an experiment but I would bet it would work.

Worth
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Old October 14, 2014   #4
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What do they taste like?

Greg
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Old October 14, 2014   #5
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You also could see if it bolts this year, and if not pile up a huge pile of leaves so it doesn't freeze and watch out for next year.
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Old October 14, 2014   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Redbaron View Post
You also could see if it bolts this year, and if not pile up a huge pile of leaves so it doesn't freeze and watch out for next year.
I think it will take more than a pile of leaves to keep it from freezing in Minnesota.

What was it like 30 below last winter.

Worth
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Old October 15, 2014   #7
lavanta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gssgarden View Post
What do they taste like?

Greg
Like a spicy radish, quite tasty.
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Old October 15, 2014   #8
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What are the pros and cons of them??

Thanks,

Greg
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Old October 15, 2014   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gssgarden View Post
What are the pros and cons of them??

Thanks,

Greg
Tastes great cna be carved into fancy things.
Cons.
Needs deep loose soil because they are so long.
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Old October 16, 2014   #10
Darren Abbey
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They also store pretty well, for radishes, because of the size.
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Old October 16, 2014   #11
lavanta
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Here is a recipe as a side dish for deep fried chicken

from Shizuo Tsuji - Japanese Cooking, A Simple Art.

Daikon Fukume-ni (Drenched Radish)
Serves six

Ingredients:
1 daikon (about 1.5 inch in diameter)
1.5 cups dashi
1 tsp salt
2 tsps light soy sauce (usukuchi)
splash of Mirin

Directions:
1. Peel the daikon and cut into 1 inch rounds, bevel the edges (for visual appeal). About six pieces for six people
2. Heat water in a medium size pot, salt lightly, and gently boil the daikon covered. About 40 minutes, until becomes slightly translucent. Drain.
3. In a medium sized pot mix the other ingredients (dashi etc.), bring just to a boil, add the cooked daikons. Simmer covered for another 30 minutes over medium heat.
4. To serve transfer one piece of daikon to an individual bowl and ladle on simmering liquid. Garnish with kinome sprigs.
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Old October 17, 2014   #12
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Thanks for the replies. I'll keep an eye out for our first frost, and will probably try to over winter it indoors. It's quite large, so I'll probably cut it to a manageable level.

One of the pros (i've read) is that they are great for drilling deep into the soil. Which is what I'm doing in one new no till plot. I also read that you shouldn't grow brassicas back to back consecutively. Has anyone heard of that?

Also, they're great in stir frys and miso/tofu soups!
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Old October 17, 2014   #13
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They make great kimchi.
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Old October 17, 2014   #14
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They would make a healthy replacement for a hotdog eating contest.
They can be carved into a door stop.
Worth
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Old October 17, 2014   #15
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I grow daikons in containers.First crop was good. I can say that a second crop in the same container will not do well. Not sure what you need to do to the soil to prep it for another planting. I replanted with corn and they did very well. Now that I harvested and pulled the corn stalks out, I'll try daikon again.
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