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Old July 13, 2013   #1
Dianne Gregory
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Default Iron Lady Tomato for late blight resistance

I'm sorry if other people posted about this already, but I'm interested in your thoughts about the Iron Lady tomato from High Mowing Seeds with regard to late blight resistance.

I am currently experimenting with Seyverna Korolneyva AKA Северная королева AKA "Queen of the North" and Tom Wagner's Magic Trick cherry.

I have had good resistance with the Seyverna but the taste is excruciatingly bland to me.

The magic trick is doing wonderfully, I am going out to get pics later today, but it is a cherry. And I don't know how it tastes yet.

And now I dont want to jinx myself but I'm not seeing signs of blight yet...

Anyway I would love to hear anyone else's thoughts and experiences on Iron Lady and any other blight resistant tomatoes they are experimenting with.
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Old July 13, 2013   #2
jennifer28
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Here is a link to the Iron Lady description

http://www.highmowingseeds.com/Organ...ato-Seeds.html

Even though it is an F1, this really looks like it may have some decent possibilities.
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Old July 13, 2013   #3
travis
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I purchased the 10-seed pack of Iron Lady this past winter intending to use Iron Lady as an input in breeding with a heirloom type tomato for a hopefully Septoria resistant line. I planted all 10 seeds. Unfortunately, the sprouts were very weak, and in the end, neither of the two more healthy seedlings made it into the garden.

I've had this same experience with several other ultra-modern, multi-resistant hybrids from seed. Maybe if I had a fully equipped greenhouse, I might have better luck with these types of seedlings. But as it is, I start seeds in the cab of my pickup truck, and transfer them to the bed of the truck as weather permits. The old standards and crosses I already have made with old standards x modern disease resistant hybrids also respond much better than the modern multi-resistant hybrids themselves to my modified "wintersown" seed starting process.
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Old July 13, 2013   #4
Dianne Gregory
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Thank you for sharing your experience with it. I think I'm going to try it because, like you, I think it has potential for breeding... I may have crop failure too, but I want to try it anyway
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Old July 13, 2013   #5
Lee
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I've got three plants growing.
One in the garden, one in a pot I just haven't planted yet, and a late planter in another garden bed.

Blight or bacterial spec/spot seems to be pretty prevalent in the garden this year, so I'll have to take good notes on its performance.

First reaction though is somewhat disappointing. It's determinate, and
has stopped setting fruit. I'm not sure if the numbers are going to
justify keeping it long term though. At least plum regal was a fruit producing machine with great disease tolerance. (Of course it wasn't very good tasting, but that's for another thread.....)

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Old July 13, 2013   #6
travis
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Since Defiance has both late and early blight tolerance, in addition to a reputation for decent flavor, the only reason I saw to grow Iron Lady was the chance at Septoria resistance to boot. I'd rather not use Plum Regal for breeding inputs as it carries male sterility genetics. The flavor was okay for a plum type tomato, and it has a great high crimson value.
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Old July 13, 2013   #7
Dianne Gregory
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I like the idea of defiant.
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Old July 15, 2013   #8
Mashman
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This year I grew a few varieties that are supposed to have some resistance to late blight:

Mountain Merit
Iron Lady
Early Sue
Magic Trick
Sky Komish

There have been cases of late blight reported in MA. So far, all varieties are healthy. Iron lady doesn't seem to be producing blossoms (at all).

I've been spraying the plants with Fung-onil which lists "late blight fruit rot" as a disease it is supposed to control. A little confusing because late blight really attacks the whole plant (leaves, stems and fruit).

So far so good....

Michael
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Old July 16, 2013   #9
efisakov
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennifer28 View Post
I'm sorry if other people posted about this already, but I'm interested in your thoughts about the Iron Lady tomato from High Mowing Seeds with regard to late blight resistance.

I am currently experimenting with Seyverna Korolneyva AKA Северная королева AKA "Queen of the North" and Tom Wagner's Magic Trick cherry.

I have had good resistance with the Seyverna but the taste is excruciatingly bland to me.

The magic trick is doing wonderfully, I am going out to get pics later today, but it is a cherry. And I don't know how it tastes yet.

And now I dont want to jinx myself but I'm not seeing signs of blight yet...

Anyway I would love to hear anyone else's thoughts and experiences on Iron Lady and any other blight resistant tomatoes they are experimenting with.
In your thread "северная королева northern queen tomato" you spelled it "severnaya koroleva", which was a correct transcription.
Good luck with your project, Jen.
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Old July 16, 2013   #10
jennifer28
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LOL thanks Ella. I try to spell, then I forget tee hee... severnaya severnaya severnaya

You should listen to me try to speak Russian. That is even more entertaining.

Seriously, I had a major head injury in December and things are still very scrambled up here
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Old July 16, 2013   #11
efisakov
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Do you speak Russian?
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Old July 16, 2013   #12
Dianne Gregory
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mashman View Post
This year I grew a few varieties that are supposed to have some resistance to late blight:

Mountain Merit
Iron Lady
Early Sue
Magic Trick
Sky Komish

There have been cases of late blight reported in MA. So far, all varieties are healthy. Iron lady doesn't seem to be producing blossoms (at all).

I've been spraying the plants with Fung-onil which lists "late blight fruit rot" as a disease it is supposed to control. A little confusing because late blight really attacks the whole plant (leaves, stems and fruit).

So far so good....

Michael
Michael

I'm trying Early Sue next year.

Thank you for the skykomish, I have those growing.
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Old July 16, 2013   #13
jennifer28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by efisakov View Post
Do you speak Russian?
Not really, I started to learn last summer but then I had a head injury so I was busy getting better. I would like to learn.
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Old July 16, 2013   #14
efisakov
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I am happy to help, Jen.
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Old July 17, 2013   #15
swamper
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I have a few Iron Lady plants growing, too soon to judge much, but they are looking good, growing next to Mountain Merit. I got my seed from High Mowing and had no problem whatsoever with seedling vigor.

The other tomato I got from HMS was Tang, an o.p. which is quite vigorous from the start.
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