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Old August 1, 2012   #1
DoubleJ
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Default Going to try keeping cuttings over winter this year

My garage stays 45-50 during the winter. The couple of times I've started seeds in January, they start but don't put on too much growth until I move them into the house. I'm thinking I could overwinter them in the garage and maybe not have to mess with seeds next year. worst case, it doesn't work and I'm not out anything. Anyone try/do this?
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Old August 1, 2012   #2
Sherry_AK
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I have been wintering-over cuttings for several years now. Except for last year, I rooted the cuttings (Sept.), planted them in small pots (about the size of a large yogurt container) and kept them in a south window in a cool room. Of course, being in a south window here in Alaska still resulted in very poor lighting conditions. I watered them as needed, about the same as houseplants. By Feb/Mar they looked pretty sad, but in April when days were getting a little longer they suddenly perked up and started growing. I potted them up as necessary and usually got ripe fruit (still indoors, of course) in late May.

But last year I gave the rooted cuttings just a few hours of artificial light each day and it made a huge difference. We ate the first ripe tomato on the first day of Spring this year and had a fairly consistent supply of tomatoes since then. I wintered over 12 plants this year, which was really too many, but sometimes I just can't help myself!

Good luck with your plan.

Sherry
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Old August 2, 2012   #3
DoubleJ
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Did you have issues with plants producing less and smaller fruits from year to year? I was told that might happen
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Old August 2, 2012   #4
Sherry_AK
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I did not notice that. But, in my case, these plants might have lived happier lives indoors than outdoors here. Other than the low light conditions of early Spring, the temperatures were probably more to their liking inside. Right now I'm growing a 3rd generation cutting of 'Trust' which has given me loads of nice ripe red tomatoes this season, and the plant is still in the house in a south window.
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Old August 6, 2012   #5
ron bruce
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Wow I may have to try this in winter... better than store bought I imagine but also to get earlier fruit next year.
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