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Old October 18, 2011   #1
lakelady
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Default Fairytale versus Musque de Provence

I thought these were the same. However, I see them listed as two species, the Fairytale as c. pepo, and the Musque as c. moschata. Are they really the same thing or two different squashes?

They're so pretty I'd like to try and grow some next year.
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Old October 18, 2011   #2
fortyonenorth
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Many places list them as the same (e.g. Musque de Provence aka Fairytale). Johnny's describes MDP as "sometimes called Fairytale..." In any event, it (they?) is a moschata, not a pepo. I've seen it described as having "10 foot vines" but mine easily grow 20' on very average soil, so leave plenty of room. Fruit size for me is generally 12-15 lbs. but I've had them over 20 lbs. I just tossed one on the compost pile that I picked in August of 2010, so they're good keepers as well.
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Old October 18, 2011   #3
lakelady
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ah, okay. Got the seeds from Heirloom Seeds and they list as c. pepo, so I was under the impression they are different. thanks!
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Old October 20, 2011   #4
Jeannine Anne
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Hi, they are the same and are definatley moschata, I think the confusion comes in because there is one called Fairy which is a pepo although they don't look remotely the same.

XX Jeannine
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Old October 20, 2011   #5
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Well, I was trying to figure out since I don't have a lot of room if I could plant several types as long as they were not the same species and just let them roam all together in one patch. I guess I could mix even the same species but they could cross pollinate, correct?
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Old October 21, 2011   #6
Jeannine Anne
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They only cross in their own family group . I grew a blue patch this year simply because I happened to have spare plants and a spare patch of ground and I know they will all have had lots of fun crossing so it will be interesting to see what the seeds produce next year,Triamble cross Blue Magic mat be fun.

Usually of course I would not do this .

As long as you plant from different species they will not cross and your summer quash need to be in the plan too so that pretty much takes care of the pepo choice but they will definately cross if you grow the same species together, they are very naughty!!

Have fun.

XX Jeannine
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Old October 23, 2011   #7
Direct Sunlight
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Here are what my musquee de provence plants look like today. I included a picture of the largest pumpkin, guessing between 15-20 pounds, just starting to show some orange on the top. Some of the others aren't far behind. Even the pitiful patch near the field (last picture) has two or three pumpkins starting to grow.
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Old October 23, 2011   #8
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Thanks for the pics! That big one looks so pretty, it will be gorgeous when it's turned! Wish I had as much sunny land as you do for growing them, my yard looks pathetic with plants in every single sunny space I can find, lol...
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Old October 24, 2011   #9
Direct Sunlight
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To each their own, I guess I'd love to have more shade most of the year. In the summer, the garden just bakes. I know in NJ you've got easier tomato-growing conditions than we do. That small plant on the right surrounded by the pumpkin vines? That's a rutgers tomato, started in late May and just now growing nicely. It'll probably just start producing when the frost hits it in the next few weeks. Sigh.

It is fun this time of year though, knowing everything will go crazy on into November, if the nighttime temperatures will allow it. Two years ago, I picked about 100 tomatoes on December 3, the day before a big frost killed the plants. Last year, I had some watermelons come in the week before Halloween.
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Old November 4, 2011   #10
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I bought two pumpkins that look just like fortyonenorth's at the ethnic store last month. They called them Castillo pumpkins. Both were around twenty pounds and there were much larger in the batch. Great pie/bread pumpkins, no straining needed. I'm going to go back and get more, I hope they still have them. They were less than .30 cents a pound. I'm wondering, if I plant the seeds, will I have any chance they will grow true? If not, what should I buy to get these?
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Old November 4, 2011   #11
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A google search yields Calabaza de Castilla or, simply, Castilla squash, but only nothing from seed vendors. Seems to be a regional Mexican variety. My avatar is Musque de Provence, which is widely available. They sure look similar, though. If my memory serves, MDP is not a French heirloom. Rather, it was introduced by a seed company out of Chicago. I suppose there's a chance that it was simply renamed, but it's hard to say.

MDP is undeniably beautiful, but it's a rampant vine and not all that productive. I would have gotten four or five fruit from one hill this year, but I lost several to raccoons. I ended up with one undersized squash for all the effort! Having said this, if you have the room, it's well worth growing.
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Old November 5, 2011   #12
Tracydr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fortyonenorth View Post
A google search yields Calabaza de Castilla or, simply, Castilla squash, but only nothing from seed vendors. Seems to be a regional Mexican variety. My avatar is Musque de Provence, which is widely available. They sure look similar, though. If my memory serves, MDP is not a French heirloom. Rather, it was introduced by a seed company out of Chicago. I suppose there's a chance that it was simply renamed, but it's hard to say.

MDP is undeniably beautiful, but it's a rampant vine and not all that productive. I would have gotten four or five fruit from one hill this year, but I lost several to raccoons. I ended up with one undersized squash for all the effort! Having said this, if you have the room, it's well worth growing.
Thanks, Fortyonenorth! I found "Fairytale" seed at Johnny's with a similar picture and description. I'm trying to decide if it's worth planting or just buying from the store. My sunny space isn't that available and I'd rather use it for tomatoes, cucumbers, beans and maybe a trombocino or costata.
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