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Have a great invention to help with gardening? Are you the self-reliant type that prefers Building It Yourself vs. buying it? Share and discuss your ideas and projects with other members.

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Old February 26, 2011   #1
RadiantSeaRodent
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Default repairing soaker hoses

Hey!

So Iv got a few lines of soaker hose, and over the years they have accumulated holes and rips. Now the hoses dont seep evenly because of these holes.
Iv read on here that alot of people splice in garden hose connectors, but has anyone ever used two part epoxy to patch small rips? I would think that it would fill into the pores of the hose and hold really well. Especially if marine epoxy was used.

What do you guys think?
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Old February 26, 2011   #2
kygreg
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I think its simpler to buy new hoses. (< But I have taken cuts from non-leaking sections of older garden hose and used this and a hose clamp on the soaker hose. Not sure about the expoxy idea. Try it. It took me 2 years to learn how to operate a door knob, so you don't want my advice.
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Old February 27, 2011   #3
GardenDmpls
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Default soaker repair

If it is a small hole, try inserting a match stick or large toothpick. The wood will swell and block the hole. Sometimes, for larger holes, I wrap a length of jute twine around it, extending out for several inches each way. It doesn't totally stop the leak, but allows the water to seep out at much the same rate as it usually does. I've kept hoses going for ten years by doing this, but left them behind in my recent move and will start fresh this spring.
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Old February 27, 2011   #4
RadiantSeaRodent
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Yes, in an ideal world I would buy new hoses, but my depression-era grandma has rubbed off on me a little too much

And the hubby and I really have to stretch our budget if we want to do anything fun at all this year. Sooo, I know I will be getting some splicers, (because i neatly chopped the the dang hose in half with the shovel myself).
I like the matchstick idea for little holes. Wouldnt of thought of that, or wrapping it with jute twine either. I bet the natural fibers, when tied very tightly, swell with moisture as well and keep the leak mostly plugged.

Meybe one could wrap a bit of tough plastic (like from a soda bottle) right over a largish rip and then use the jute twine to hold it in place? hmm.

Might try all three methods, I do have all the materials. The only thing I worry about the tiniest little bit is that with the epoxy method, even after the rip is long since repaired, the epoxy long dried and set, that it would leech chemicals into my soil when i use the hose.
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Old February 27, 2011   #5
BlackestKrim
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I also heard about using small pieces of PVC pipe with hose clamps. I think I like the idea of sections of old garden hose better.

The chemicals involved in the small amounts of epoxy used on a hose, spread throughout the nearby soil mass, should not result in any meaningful level of toxins. Of that, only a tiny fraction would be carried up into the plant.
If you are concerned, I know there are marine epoxies for aquarium use. If they don't kill sensitive little fishies, I doubt it'll hurt people. Once an epoxy cures it shouldnt be reactive.

I have heard people say electrical tape works, but I am skeptical. I have heard Gorilla tape works and that is plausible- and I have some. I can try it out and see.
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Old February 27, 2011   #6
rwsacto
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If it is a small hole, I sometimes wrap the hose with the silicone repair tape that stretches and sticks to itself.

If it is a split, pitchfork gash, tomato cage puncture, dog bite, weedeater whack, (how do these things happen anyway?)
I cut out the bad part and use an irrigation tube compression fitting to splice the ends together. They come in 1/2 in. diameter (green ends) and 5/8 in. diameter (black ends). You can also use the elbows and Tee's to customize your soaker hose layout.
The fittings are cheaper if you buy in bulk!
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Old February 27, 2011   #7
RadiantSeaRodent
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Ahh, I like the idea of using elbow pieces. I always have the darnest time curving the hose around in my long narrow beds without it crimping and upsetting the water flow.
Thanks for all the great ideas!
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Old March 1, 2011   #8
dice
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Silver duct tape works for me. (I do not worry about the few
inches that no water escapes from.)
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Old March 1, 2011   #9
dustdevil
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Maybe try a rubber inner tube patch kit. Big splits need a joiner and clamps/cheapie zip ties. Food grade silicone caulking for small stuff.
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Old March 15, 2011   #10
b54red
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I was in Harbor Freight the other day and found the 1/2 inch hose menders and the male and female connections on sale for only 37 cents each. I bought a bag full because I have a lot of soaker hoses and many needed to be repaired.
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Old March 15, 2011   #11
Timbotide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by b54red View Post
I was in Harbor Freight the other day and found the 1/2 inch hose menders and the male and female connections on sale for only 37 cents each. I bought a bag full because I have a lot of soaker hoses and many needed to be repaired.
Bill, How long has Harbor Freight been in your area. The next time we are
Traveling thru there I may stop there and check them out.


Tim
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Old March 15, 2011   #12
b54red
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They have only been open here a little over a year. They have saved me a ton on wire ties which I use by the hundreds every year. They also carry a neat little pruner that I use for pruning tomatoes and cutting my twine. I wear out a couple of pair every year. That twine will really work on the blades but they were on sale for less than 4 dollars at the same time I picked up the hose connectors. They are usually between 7 and 9 dollars so I got several of them. Now if I can just find a cheap source for natural twine. Last year I used 2 of the 2500 ft rolls. That is the biggest drawback of using trellises but I still use much less twine than when I was using stakes.
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Old December 26, 2011   #13
janezee
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The electrical tape on my self-imposed garden fork hole has held up for 2 years, and shows no sign of giving up. Really cheap replacement, if it does.
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Old December 26, 2011   #14
Worth1
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I used the black gorilla tape on mine.
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Old December 27, 2011   #15
dice
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I had not thought of this when the question was originally asked,
but a product that might be useful for this is Vetrap (or non-3M
equivalent product). It is kind of a thick bandaging tape, 1" to 6"
wide, flexible, that sticks to itself (kind of like Velcro) but not to skin
or hair. It does not use adhesive, so there is nothing for moisture to
get under and cause to become unstuck. It simply physically sticks
to itself.

Great for sprains and similar (unlike an ace bandage, you do not need
pins or clips to keep it from unwinding). It is kind of a rubbery material,
entirely waterproof. It is porous (has air holes; it "breathes"), so it would
let water seep through it.

This is what it looks like:
http://www.amazon.com/Three-M-3-M-Ve.../dp/B0002YFS2O
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