Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old June 27, 2010   #1
sprtsguy76
Tomatovillian™
 
sprtsguy76's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Santa Clara CA
Posts: 1,118
Default What are you using in ground Dolomite Lime or Garden Gypsum?

I've been using gypsum for the last 4 years in my beds. Got me to thinking why I have not been using dolomite lime, my reasons are the following: 1-when I got my soil tested the report said to supplement with gypsum, 2-I always thought that dolomite lime would drive my soil ph too high and while tomato plants will grow well in a wide range of ph I thought 6.5-6 would be ideal. My understanding is that gypsum doesn't dramatically change soil ph, but maybe I'm worng about that. Then I thought about gypsum not having any Mg and dolomite lime does and how I was going to supplement Mg, so I put a good shake of epsom salt in my beds a couple weeks before planting. I didn't add compost to my beds this year but have in the past. Anyway what are ya'll using to supplement Ca in the ground/beds and the reasons/believe behind that. Thanks

Damon
sprtsguy76 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2010   #2
VORTREKER
Tomatovillian™
 
VORTREKER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pottsboro Texas 7B-8A TRANSITION ZONE
Posts: 77
Default

I have never understood why folks focus on the phosphorus portion and basically ignore the calcium portion of bone meal--It is a good organic--slow release--form of calcium and will prevent BER due to calcium deficiency.
__________________
Have you gardened all of your life? Not yet.
VORTREKER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2010   #3
shlacm
Tomatovillian™
 
shlacm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central VA
Posts: 437
Default

I couldn't decide which to use... so, I'm using about half and half, lol!
shlacm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2010   #4
Aphid
Tomatovillian™
 
Aphid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Nashville TN zone 6-B
Posts: 133
Default

my understanding is that magnesium is needed for the soil/roots to process calcium.
can't find proof , just remember hearing it somewhere.

hope someone can clarify this
Aphid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 27, 2010   #5
shlacm
Tomatovillian™
 
shlacm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Central VA
Posts: 437
Default

Which is why I toss a handful of Epsom Salts on the ground when I fertilize every couple of weeks.
shlacm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 28, 2010   #6
VORTREKER
Tomatovillian™
 
VORTREKER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pottsboro Texas 7B-8A TRANSITION ZONE
Posts: 77
Default

According to Dr. Stanley Barber, Purdue Univ., "There is no research justification for the added expense of obtaining a definite Ca:Mg ratio in the soil. Research indicates that plant yield or quality is not appreciably affected over a wide range of Ca:Mg ratios in the soil."


Gypsum is recommended for two primary purposes. They are
  1. To remove excess sodium (Na)
  2. To build soil calcium (Ca) levels when a pH change is not desired
__________________
Have you gardened all of your life? Not yet.

Last edited by VORTREKER; June 28, 2010 at 07:29 AM. Reason: ADDENDUM
VORTREKER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 28, 2010   #7
Timmah!
Tomatovillian™
 
Timmah!'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Elizabethtown, Kentucky 6a
Posts: 754
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by VORTREKER View Post
According to Dr. Stanley Barber, Purdue Univ., "There is no research justification for the added expense of obtaining a definite Ca:Mg ratio in the soil. Research indicates that plant yield or quality is not appreciably affected over a wide range of Ca:Mg ratios in the soil."


Gypsum is recommended for two primary purposes. They are
  1. To remove excess sodium (Na)
  2. To build soil calcium (Ca) levels when a pH change is not desired
You're forgetting another important reason to use Gypsum: To make the soil more friable; making it better drained & aerated, reducing crusting, erosion, and compaction and allowing better root penetration.
Timmah! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old June 28, 2010   #8
VORTREKER
Tomatovillian™
 
VORTREKER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Pottsboro Texas 7B-8A TRANSITION ZONE
Posts: 77
Default

Timmah--you are absolutely correct--Thanks
__________________
Have you gardened all of your life? Not yet.
VORTREKER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old July 1, 2010   #9
dice
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: PNW
Posts: 4,750
Default

Both, usually. pH in my in-ground beds is up to around 6.5-6.8,
so I have stopped using dolomite and only added gypsum this
year. Those beds have sul-po-mag for potassium and
magnesium, too, so the magnesium part of dolomite is not
an issue.
__________________
--
alias
dice is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:47 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2014 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★