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Old January 16, 2010   #1
PaulF
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Default anaheim type?

Last year we grew anaheim peppers and liked them. Now I am reading about anaheim "type" peppers. The only source I found for anaheims last year was a catalog I do not want tho utilize this year. What exactly is an anaheim type pepper and what are the varieties I might get from some of the seed sellers with good reputations?
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Old January 16, 2010   #2
shelleybean
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The OP versions are usually just called Anaheim. They are listed in the hot pepper section at Southern Exposure, Victory, Baker Creek and TGS. Sometimes the hybrid versions sometimes have another name but the original is usually just called Anaheim and some people call it a New Mexico chile. They are one of my favorites for chile rellanos!!
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Old January 16, 2010   #3
montanamato
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Check out Native Seed Search...They list many anaheim type peppers under the seed listings for chilies...I have grown many of their chilies and have had great crops from Alcalde and Santa Domingo...I consider anaheim type peppers the type commonly grown in New Mexico and used green for stuffing and chili verde, etc. Not sure if that is a technical term and MDVPC can probably tell us more...

They have many varieties for higher elevation and shorter seasons...I order blue cornmeal and ground chili pepper from them too...They have very reasonable dried beans too...

Jeanne
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Old January 16, 2010   #4
mtbigfish
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Anaheim (California Green Chile or Long Green Chile): One of the most commonly used varieties in the United States, especially in stuffed chiles. This chili is long, slender and lobed, green or red in color and mildly hot. They can be eaten when green or when they are their mature red color.
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Old January 16, 2010   #5
sprtsguy76
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I love Anaheim peppers, not too hot and not too mild, great for grilling and roasting. Last night I made mushroom burgers with grilled Anaheim peppers, yum. I bought a Anaheim 'type' hybrid pepper from tgs this year and will be growing it out. I forget what its called.

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Old January 16, 2010   #6
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Yes, those green chile cheeseburgers are soooooo good!
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Old January 16, 2010   #7
TZ-OH6
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The Anaheim pepper is a low heat offshoot of the New Mexico pepper No.9 developed by Fabian Garcia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaheim_pepper

These peppers are usually called Numex types. I don't know if there is an actual Anaheim cultivar commercially grown any more (the cultivar name gets changed to "Anahiem" on the package). Numex 6-4 was the basis for the New Mexico green chille industry for many years, Big Jim and Sandia are the next steps up in heat level from Numex 6-4. Sonora (sometimes called Sonora-Anaheim) is a large low heat anaheim type, and probably a good choice if you are looking for low heat for stuffing. I grew seeds from a package of dried anaheims and they were much smaller and less regular in shape than the Sonora.

The University of New Mexico Chile Pepper Institute has some good information on varieties through their shop if you download th PDF catalog

http://aces.nmsu.edu/chilepepperinst...l#anchor_23260


You can find Sonora and many other numex types at tomato growers supply

http://www.tomatogrowers.com/



Stay away from Reimers Seeds. They have a good selection on paper but most pepper growers say that their seed is bad and often mislabeled.
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Old January 16, 2010   #8
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Thanks for the input. I have ordered from TGS. Ours were so mild I didn't think to look in the hot pepper sections. Now I know.
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Old January 16, 2010   #9
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The real Sandia is very hot, Barker is also. At least the ones grown around here-I live about 35 miles from NMSU. If you are growing Barker or Sandia, and they arent hot, you dont have the real thing. And I eat a lot of hot chile.

For a milder green chile, Joe Parker and Big Jim are good.

Nothing like a green chile burger, chile relleno or caldillo. We use green chile on everything and buy it during harvest by the bushel. I cant grow enough for us, so we get it from a couple of different growers we know.
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Old January 17, 2010   #10
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mdvpc
Yes and tonight I just made my sauce for chile relleno's that I also use on hueveos rancheros, burritos and enchiladas
Dennis
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Old January 17, 2010   #11
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Check out this articla and order some seeds from NMSU.

NMSU Produces Chile with 500 Percent More Flavor and Aroma.

http://www.scottrobertsweb.com/NMSU-...avor-and-Aroma


~DiggingDog
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Old January 17, 2010   #12
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Go to http://www.chileplants.com/ and use their search engine. Go to the "All Pod Types" drop down box and search on "Anaheim/New Mex" . You'll get lots of nice pepper porny pictures and descriptions of different Anaheim type peppers. If you find a variety you like, you can google for a seed source. Cross Country only sells plants.
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Old January 17, 2010   #13
mdvpc
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Dennis: Sounds wonderful and very versatile.
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Old January 24, 2010   #14
mtbigfish
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mdvpc
It is and easy to make too - but I need to learn to make a mexican and italian stewed tomatoes using my homegrown OP/heirloom tomatoes - never really made much sauce from my harvests
In my recipe I use S&W or another brand of canned mexican and italian stewed tomatoes - then lots of rings of onions and peppers (if desired chilies) - various ones and colors about 1/4 to 1/3 inch thick and 1 1/2 to 2" strips - fresh garlic - saute those first - add the tomatoes blended (would roast fresh ones) and season to taste with those you like for example seasoned salt and pepper - fresh garlic (above) or garlic powder - cilantro - if you like it sweeter you can add sugar or splenda but wait until it thickens a little

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Old January 24, 2010   #15
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Mtbigfish:

Caldillo with bison is great-I cant tell from your post if you are talking about caldillo.

I ordered seed for "Biad's Reserve NuMex Heritage 6-4, a pepper with medium spiciness, was first released in 2009." Actually, one of my employees husbands went to Biad's and got seed. They live in Las Cruces and she commutes to El Paso, about 35 miles away from Cruces.
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