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Old July 13, 2009   #1
SouthCoast
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Default World record vege's and mycorrhizae

I noticed this mycorrhizae on bigpumpkins website. Has any one used this on their tomatoes? It seems to be the thing to use on giant pumpkins... I've used it on my tomatoes with great results. I just wish I had world class seeds to go along with it.

"RTI's pumpkin pro is the mycorrhizae used to produce the worlds largest pumpkin three-years in a row. (2006 1502 pounds Ron Wallace, 2007 Joe Jutras 1689 and 2008 Steve Connolly 1568 pounds.) Every leaf node from beginning to end was trenched, treated and buried using Pumpkin Pro. The big difference we noticed is that later in the season the pumpkins were able to maintain a "top" weight for a longer period of time and also our pumpkins grew into the month of October. Something that has never seemed possible before in our area."

Ron Wallace

http://www.bigpumpkins.com/

My tomatoes on the left have mycorrhizae and the ones on the right don't. Oh I didn't even notice it but look at my peppers to! the ones on the right don't have any mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae doesn't work wonders with everything (on some of my flowers the with and with out are equal). I'd say when it comes to peppers, squash, and tomatoes the stuff makes a visible difference.

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Old July 13, 2009   #2
Billy K
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it's one piece of the puzzle,and there's alot of pieces to the puzzle..any ways i'm using them on tom's and pumpkins,,,i'l let you know at the end of the season
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Old July 14, 2009   #3
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Price is a bit on the nuts side.


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Old July 14, 2009   #4
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Kevin I hear ya. Check out the following. Ami

http://www.fungi.com/mycogrow/index.html

http://www.tandjenterprises.com/
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Old July 14, 2009   #5
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Mycorrhizae were all the rage for tomatoes back in the late 90's and early 2000's and at one site where I posted one fellow was selling it.

At that time several folks grew their tomatoes, the same variety, with and without myco and found no difference.

I've wondered myself since myco's are known to increase both water and P transport thru the roots and were first discovered in the SW associated with corn plantings of variouis indigenous Indian groups in terms of growing corn in the absence of much rain, whether it's related to different soils that do have xs P and plenty of rain that makes the difference when some find that mycos help and some find that they don't, when talking about tomatoes.

Lousy paragraph as one sentence I know, but what you see is what you get.
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Old July 15, 2009   #6
SouthCoast
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Default I think its worth it...

Quote:
Originally Posted by amideutch View Post
Kevin I hear ya. Check out the following. Ami
That 10 lbs of mycorrhizae did most of my vege garden. Its the healthiest garden I have ever grown. No signs of ill health to be found. In the picture with the rose in the middle, the tomatoes on the right have miracle grow at the recomended rate. On the left I used 'pumpkin pro'. Today the one with mycorrhizae has more lush growth than the the chemical alternative. No doubt knowing there is an organic altertinitive that grows as well and better then conventional is worth getting excited about.
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Old July 15, 2009   #7
SouthCoast
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This is my first year using mycorrhizae. The pumpkin grower has been trying it for 4 years. He who told me about mycorrhizae and he said that the pumpkin pro was the one to use because of its consistent results. He had used other mycorrhizae and it didn't seem to do anything.
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Old July 15, 2009   #8
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If you grow a winter cover crop (pretty much anything used
for that except radishes and mustard, whose roots are not
inhabited by mycorrhizae), the mycorrhizae will inhabit the
roots of the cover crop over the winter, and it will still be
there in your garden when you plant next year's crop (saves
buying a new batch every year).
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Old July 15, 2009   #9
amideutch
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THE FACTS

This is the info I got off the RTI site for Pumpkin Pro and for Mycogrow off the Fungi Perfecti site. The Pumpkin Pro coverage is 5lbs per 750 Sq. Feet and same coverage for the MycoGrow is 3oz.
If you notice on the Pumpkin Pro the only Mycorrhizae it contains is Glomus intraradices which is listed as a NON PLANT FOOD INGREDIENT! Which leads me to believe there probably is ferts in it as it is not 10lbs of pure Glomus intraradices!

The VAM (Vesicular Arbuscular Mycorrhyzae) contained in MycoGrow is;
Endomycorrhizal fungi Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae, Glomus aggregatum, Glomus clarum, Glomus deserticola, Glomus etunicatum, Gigaspora margarita, Gigaspora brasilianum, Gigaspora monosporum Ectomycorrhizal fungi Rhizopogon villosullus, Rhizopogon luteolus, Rhizopogon amylopogon, Rhizopogon fulvigleba, Pisolithus tinctorius, Laccaria bicolor, Laccaria laccata, Scleroderma cepa, Scleroderma citrinum, Suillus granulatas, Suillus punctatapies







RTI PUMPKIN PRO:
4207 Bulk 10 lb. bag 10 lbs $60.00

PROAUXILIARY SOIL AND PLANT SUBSTANCE

NON PLANT FOOD INGREDIENT

Contains the following species of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi:
Glomus intraradices.................120 spores cm3
In 2006, Ron Wallace used RTI inoculants to break the world record at 1,502 lbs.In 2007 it was used by growers that produced 10 of the top 20 largest pumpkins in the world, including Joe Jutra's new record breaking pumpkin at 1,689
Directions for Use:
Transplants and Rooted Cuttings: Place directly into the planting hole or in close proximity to the newly developing roots.
Potting Soil and Soil Amendments:
Mix thoroughly into the medium assuring that an abundant amount is present in the root zone. Broadcast and incorporate by tilling or hand mixing into the soil with the seed.
Application Rates:
-Mix into sowing medium before planting seeds
-Broadcast and till at 5 lbs. per 750 sq. ft.
-Mix approx. 1/2 cup into planting hole
-Mix approx. 1/2 cup into any area where rooting is promoted


FUNGI PERFECTI MYCOGROW:


MycoGrow™ Soluble
for Potting Soils & Rooting Media
MycoGrow™ Soluble is similar to Plant Success™ Tabs but is more concentrated, containing more spores and more species, plus other beneficial organisms. Consisting of powdered spore mass rather than tablets, MycoGrow™ Soluble is great for adding to rooting media or commercial potting soils. Sold in one pound and one ounce increments. An ounce is sufficient to treat 125–250 plants covering approximately 250 square feet.
One ounce $5.95
One pound $79.95
Note: this product cannot be shipped to Hawaii.

Contains concentrated spore mass of the following: Endomycorrhizal fungi Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae, Glomus aggregatum, Glomus clarum, Glomus deserticola, Glomus etunicatum, Gigaspora margarita, Gigaspora brasilianum, Gigaspora monosporum Ectomycorrhizal fungi Rhizopogon villosullus, Rhizopogon luteolus, Rhizopogon amylopogon, Rhizopogon fulvigleba, Pisolithus tinctorius, Laccaria bicolor, Laccaria laccata, Scleroderma cepa, Scleroderma citrinum, Suillus granulatas, Suillus punctatapies Trichoderma Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma konigii Beneficial Bacteria Bacillus subtillus, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus azotoformans, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus coagulans, Bacillus pumlis, Bacillus thuringiensis, Bacillus stearothermiphilis, Paenibacillus polymyxa, Paenibacillus durum, Paenibacillus florescence, Paenibacillus gordonae, Azotobacter polymyxa, Azotobacter chroococcum, Sacchromyces cervisiae, Streptomyces griseues, Streptomyces lydicus, Pseudomonas aureofaceans, Deinococcus erythromyxa
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Old July 15, 2009   #10
SouthCoast
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Default Ecto mycorrhizae doesn't help tomatoes

None of the ecto works with tomatoes: Ectomycorrhizal fungi Rhizopogon villosullus, Rhizopogon luteolus, Rhizopogon amylopogon, Rhizopogon fulvigleba, Pisolithus tinctorius, Laccaria bicolor, Laccaria laccata, Scleroderma cepa, Scleroderma citrinum, Suillus granulatas, Suillus punctatapies.

The plant growth promoting bacteria look really fun to play with though, theres some good stuff out on them. I've been looking for products that have those little buggers. They are common in india and philipines but not so much here yet.

All mycorrhizae is a 'non plant food ingredient', thats the way the government says its supposed to be labeled which leads me to believe the the product is labeled correctly and has nothing to do with fertilizers.

With more than 40 tomatoes growing in my yard I know the stuff makes a big differance. The product having been credited by the growers of the largest vegetables man kind has ever seen I'd say its a safe purchase. A search for Plant Success seems to be favored by cannabis growers not who arn't really winning any awards as of yet.

The image with the corn leaf sticking into the picture is the chemical treated plant.

The other picture is the soil microbe plant.

Also you can see my garden when when I first planted the tomato trial, with the rose in the middle.
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Old July 15, 2009   #11
amideutch
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"None of the ecto works with tomatoes". Tell me something I don't know. If you want to go just the vegetable only route there is the;
MycoGrow™ For Vegetables
A blend of endomycorrhizal species selected specifically for vegetables, 1 ounce of MycoGrow™ For Vegetables is mixed with 1 quart of water for a water drench. This product can also be banded in rows or side dressed before plantings, or mixed directly in pots and trays. Sold in one pound and one ounce increments.
One ounce MGV100 $1.95
One pound MGV110 $24.95
Note: this product cannot be shipped to Hawaii.

Contains concentrated spore mass of the following:
Endomycorrhizal fungi Glomus intraradices, Glomus mosseae, Glomus aggregatum, Glomus etunicatum

And it's only $1.95 an ounce. The reason I use the MycoGrow soluble is that it also has Tricoderma and the Beneficial Bacteria as well. The why for the Ectomycorrhiza is to make it a multi-use Myco which can be used in the entire yard. Ecto is for woody plants and trees.

I've been using Myco's now for 3 years and if you do a search of the website you will see several threads and posts on the subject. Sorry to say but your Pumpkin Pro with only Glomus intraradices does not impress. And after reviewing several different Myco products, Fungi Perfecti and BioVam from T&J enterprises both of which I have used give the biggest bang for the buck in my opinion and it doesn't take 5 pounds to inoculate a garden. Ami
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Old July 15, 2009   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amideutch View Post
Pumpkin Pro with only Glomus intraradices does not impress. And after reviewing several different Myco products, Fungi Perfecti and BioVam from T&J enterprises both of which I have used give the biggest bang for the buck in my opinion and it doesn't take 5 pounds to inoculate a garden. Ami
Being that the mycorrhizae you are speaking of has no world records I'll still go with the products that have a proven track record. Aside from mycorrhizae Im trying other plant growth promoting bacteria. Tom at extremepumpkinstore let me try Azospirillum.

Im using it with mycorrhizae, by itsself, and I have a control.

The pics with M written on the pots are using mycorrhizae

AM are azospirillum and Mycorrhizae

C is control
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Old July 15, 2009   #13
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My question for both of you is how the fruitset is looking. I'm all for lush growth, but are you seeing increases in the production using this stuff? I see an awful lot of blooms in the pics. Are they putting on mater babies or are they just blooming? Or is it too early in your season to tell yet?
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Old July 16, 2009   #14
amideutch
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Barbee, this should answer your question. Here is the link from the article that I copied the following paragraph. Ami

http://biblioteca.universia.net/html.../42538996.html


Colonisation by indigenous AM fungi had no effect on the growth or nutrient status of field grown tomatoes. In contrast, pre-inoculation with AM fungi increased fruit yield by a mean of approx. 40% in 76R and U941. This was the result of an 18% increase in the fresh weight of individual fruits and, when inoculation was combined with reduced P fertilisation, a 21% increase in the number of fruits on each plant. The increase in the number of fruits on each plant was associated with an increase in the number of flowers at the most advanced growth stage. Inoculation also increased vegetative growth, and fruit P, Zn and Ca contents. A small (4%) decrease in fruit brix was more than offset by increased yield. This study has shown that while AM fungi indigenous to tomato farm soils have the ability to substantially colonise tomato, they appear to have little effect on tomato growth, yield or nutrition in the field. In contrast, inoculation of tomato seedlings with mutualistic AM fungi during nursery production can substantially increase the growth, yield and fruit nutrient contents of field-grown tomatoes under commercial conditions. This increase could also be enhanced by a reduction in P fertilisation. Increased yield and fruit nutrient contents, and decreased P fertilisation neatly address the aims of increased agricultural sustainability. Incorporating pre-inoculation of tomato into existing farming practices has a potential to increase the productivity and sustainability of processing tomato production worldwide.
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Old July 16, 2009   #15
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Well that sounds good, for sure. I think I'm going to give this a try next year. I do have 2 plants that I believe were treated with this product that I got in the CHOPTAG exchange. I will have to talk to the grower at the tasting to make sure that's what he used (he told hubby about something new he used..I wasn't there). Anyway, those plants look really good and are putting babies out like crazy.
So make sure you continue to talk about this stuff in the winter so I remember to get some
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