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Old August 29, 2019   #76
DonDuck
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Okra is one of the most interesting plants I've ever grown. I notice something new every time I look at them.
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Old August 30, 2019   #77
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDuck View Post
Okra is one of the most interesting plants I've ever grown. I notice something new every time I look at them.
You sure it's okra.
Maybe those hipster squirrels planted something else.

Last edited by Worth1; August 30, 2019 at 05:17 AM.
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Old March 21, 2020   #78
MuddyBuckets
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Default Planting Okra

What is the member experience on planting okra seedlings started indoor under lights. Should the seedlings be planted at root ball depth or can they be planted deeper (up to the cotyledons), especially for the leggy seedlings?

My okra seedlings are 4"-6" tall, some are quite leggy but healthy. Ready to set out now in 7b with no frost on the horizon.
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Old March 22, 2020   #79
chrismith82
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Default Early for okra...

While it's nice and warm at the moment, I'd say we're a long way from being frost safe and the okra will die at the slightest frost. If starting okra indoors, you only need 2-4 weeks before the average last frost. My guess is you started then about a month early. You can transplant them to the cotyledons though and if by some craziness we don't get another frost, then you'll have the earliest okra in all of zone 7B!!

Good luck.
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Old March 29, 2020   #80
GoDawgs
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I've found that success for me in starting okra seedlings depends on the variety. I used to do all my okra in sets when I was using 'Cajun Delight', a compact grower that did well for me. Starting in 2015 I couldn't find the seed anymore so started experimenting with other okras.

Burmese and Jing Orange, both taller than the Cajun Delight, were selected because I figured that with their SE Asian heritage they're stand up well to the heat and humidity here. Well, they grew so fast and got leggy that I had to toss them and just sow directly in the ground. The same thing happened with every other okra I've tried and it makes sense because none of them were dwarf or "compact" types. Chalk this up to "anecdotal" observation. LOL!

But this year I found and bought Cajun Jewel which is supposed to be a dwarf type getting 3-4' tall. I will definitely start some of these in pots to test my theory. Choppee's first time out last year was a winner and will be grown again but the seed will go straight into the garden.

As far as transplanting, I've planted them just slightly deeper than the top of the root ball and no more.
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