Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

Member discussion regarding the methods, varieties and merits of growing tomatoes.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old December 23, 2009   #1
jungseed
Tomatovillian™
 
jungseed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Pardeeville, WI
Posts: 318
Default Aunt Ruby's German Green

I know how much you guys hate those "which are the best" threads, but...
I have found someone to start my seeds in Canada before I get there again this year. I want to do 2 plants each of a pink, purple, green, black and cherry. I picked out:

Brandywine (pink)
Cherokee Purple (purple)
Black Krim (black)
Sungold (cherry)

The question, is Aunt Ruby's German Green a good green when ripe tomato? I know that is subjective question but does it produce and have decent flavor? This is all assuming I will get tomatoes. The track record on that isn't suggesting it can happen. As I told you before, I and mother nature currently have a score of:
2 years/ 12 plants = 1 tomato eaten

But I just can't give up. If you have any other suggestions on my list, feel free. I plant outside June 1st ish and get snow by Oct 7th ish.
I'm hoping to really lick mother nature this year - but she'll probably kick my ______ again.
jungseed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 23, 2009   #2
clara
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,343
Default

Aunt Ruby's German Green (planted last year) was very good as of taste, but for me too late (first ripe fruits end of September). Season here normally ends about 4 weeks later. Therefore it will not be back, although taste was pretty good. Perhaps you should try Aunt Ruby's German Green CHERRY, as cherries are much earlier. clara
clara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 23, 2009   #3
salix
Tomatovillian™
 
salix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: north central B.C.
Posts: 2,309
Default

Gotta tell you, Grub's Mystery Green is an awesome green-when-ripe, and it is early enough for me (plant out also about June 1 and first hard frost either late August or by mid-September). Also, Monomakh's Hat/Cap/Chapeau is early, tasty and productive...
salix is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 23, 2009   #4
roper2008
Tomatovillian™
 
roper2008's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Virginia Bch, VA (7b)
Posts: 1,336
Default

I planted Aunt Ruby's German Green, and it was very good. Nice
big tomatoes. That's a picture of it sliced by my tomatoville name.
roper2008 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 23, 2009   #5
DuckCreekFarms
Tomatovillian™
 
DuckCreekFarms's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Mounds, Oklahoma
Posts: 257
Default

I planted Aunt Ruby's this year, but didn't get any fruit. I hear it is awesome though, I did get lots of fruit on Grub's Mystery Green and it was very good. so good that I am listing in my plants sales this year.....
Gary V S
DuckCreekFarms is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 24, 2009   #6
jungseed
Tomatovillian™
 
jungseed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Pardeeville, WI
Posts: 318
Default

Appears Grub's is an earlier tomato which would be good. But then, the problem for me is that I would then have to order one packet of seeds from another vendor. Like the rest of you, I hate to pay that handling fee for one packet of seeds. Here, if I walk out and pull my own seed order, I can have that charge waived AND get the employee discount. I call myself frugal. The only other choices I have for a green when ripe here are Evergreen and Green Zebra. Hadn't heard much good about either of them. But hadn't heard alot about Aunt Ruby's either. Maybe I should go orange or yellow instead of green.
jungseed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 24, 2009   #7
carolyn137
Moderator Emeritus
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 21,169
Default

I grew ARG from the time it came out until Cherokee Green became available and switched to the latter ASAP after tasting it and seeing how it performed. And it's not a late variety.

In the past I've grown maybe 10-15 other green when ripes, meaning the large ones, not Green Doctors or Green Grape the cherries,and that includes Green Giant, Humph, Charlies's Green, Emerald Evergreen, Moldovan, the Shaka, I can't spell it right now but is also known as Malachite Box, and on and on, but for a large green when ripe I definitely prefer Cherokee Green over all others I've grown.
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 24, 2009   #8
b54red
Tomatovillian™
 
b54red's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Alabama
Posts: 7,020
Default

Seems to me since you've only gotten one edible fruit in two years you might want to consider planting only one each of however many plants you have room to grow and give yourself a better chance to find a good productive tomato.
b54red is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 24, 2009   #9
Ruth_10
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: MO z6a near St. Louis
Posts: 1,349
Default

Grub's Mystery Green is my favorite. For a smaller (plant and fruits), but earlier, GWR I like Lime Green Salad.
__________________
--Ruth

Some say the glass half-full. Others say the glass is half-empty. To an engineer, it’s twice as big as it needs to be.
Ruth_10 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 24, 2009   #10
Fusion_power
Tomatovillian™
 
Fusion_power's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Alabama
Posts: 2,212
Default

For your climate, Aunt Ruby's German Green is very unlikely to make a crop. I agree that Cherokee Green would be a better choice.

From your list above, you have picked medium to long season tomatoes for most of your varieties. I would suggest asking a different question. Which tomatoes would be early enough to mature for your climate?

Gregori's Altai would be one of my preeminent suggestions given that it will mature fruit in 65 days. Kimberly or Bloody Butcher would also be on that list.


There are some things you should be doing to set out bigger plants. Have them potted up into 1 gallon containers when they are 5 weeks old. Grow them in the gallon containers for another 5 weeks and then set them out. You will have very large plants by then that have a good chance of making fruit in a short season.

DarJones
Fusion_power is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25, 2009   #11
Wi-sunflower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,591
Default

I agree with what DarJones mentioned about your choice overall.

Brandywine is sometimes iffy even here in Wi, let alone in Canada.

Black Krim, while it is an early tomato, is an iffy grower. It seems to have good years and off years for me. in the off years I get little if any fruit set. Even in the good years it isn't a heavy cropper for me.

I second the choice of Gregori's Altai instead of either Brandywine or Black Krim or both.

Another tomato that was quite early for me last year was Russian Apple Tree. While it has been mentioned that it's just a re-named Matina, I grew both last year and the RATs were several days earlier and enough bigger than the Matinas that it was noticable. Not a lot bigger, but enough you could see it. They also seemed to produce longer than the Matinas last year.

My own GWR suggestion would be the cherry Green Doctors as it was nice and early and had an interesting spicy taste I liked.

Te suggestion about bigger plants is also good, but when you are depending on others to do the starting, it could be a problem. Here is a page on my web site that I print and hand out at the market for those wanting those "first tomatoes". http://knapps-fresh-vegies.netfirms.com/tips.html

It's adapted from something printed in Organic Gardening a long time ago. A neighbor of mine uses a technique similar to that with a concrete wire cage and a fence post to hold it all in place. His plants will be growing out the top of the cage by the middle of June most years. He also has tomatoes several weeks before I do.

Carol
Wi-sunflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25, 2009   #12
carolyn137
Moderator Emeritus
 
carolyn137's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Upstate NY, zone 4b/5a
Posts: 21,169
Default

My own GWR suggestion would be the cherry Green Doctors as it was nice and early and had an interesting spicy taste I liked.

****

Carol, I noted in my post above that I was talking about only the large ones, but I do agree with you that if one wanted to grow a green when ripe cherry I too would suggest Green Doctors, as I did in my post above if cherries were asked for, or the newest one Green Doctors Frosted.
__________________
Carolyn
carolyn137 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25, 2009   #13
Wi-sunflower
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,591
Default

I know she seemed to be looking for a big GWR, but with her dificult situation, maybe going with cherries and other smaller early varieties may be her only good option.

Carol
Wi-sunflower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 25, 2009   #14
ddsack
Tomatovillian™
 
ddsack's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Northern Minnesota - zone 3
Posts: 3,135
Default

We drive up to fish in Ontario each summer, and Jungseeds fishing resort would be about 160+ miles further north in a straight shot from me. I would have to agree that it would be very difficult to get the larger tomatoes ripe there, since I think I am at about the northern limit for pushing success right here. Our day and night temps run maybe 5 degrees warmer here, and I suspect the night temps are affected by that big body of cold water the resort is on into July. Maybe if the toms were started very early, potted up into successively larger containers without getting too rootbound, and then grown under some kind of plastic cover, either high tunnels or just some simple lathe and plastic removable panels that can be wired together to create a heat trap. Growing close to a sunny south facing house wall would also speed things up. Growing in large pots or plastic tubs would help with soil temps. You can get quite creative with plastic lean-to's or simple tents, keeping ventilation in mind for hot and sunny days. I definitely would grow a couple of earlies like Stupice or Aurora just to make sure of some ripe tomatos to enjoy. Unless we have an unusually sunny hot summer, I don't think the larger heirlooms can ripen without some help from plastic sheeting that far north.
__________________
Dee

**************
ddsack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old December 28, 2009   #15
jungseed
Tomatovillian™
 
jungseed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Pardeeville, WI
Posts: 318
Default

In other words, I need to re-think my entire list. That's why I asked the question here, to get the right answer. I just asked the wrong question to start with. I was going for taste and colors. If I'm only going to get 1 or 2 (wishing here) tomatoes, I wanted them to be really something special to eat. The one Celebrity tomato I got last year tasted almost good but I think that was because it was the only one. I've had much better tasting tomatoes. I was under the impression that all the "really early" tomatoes are tastless. I'll start looking at earlier tomatoes. Looks like only Black Krim can stay on the list.
jungseed is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:45 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2022 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★