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Old May 31, 2019   #1
whoose
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Default Scab Resistant Potato

New help with specific varaities of scab resistant potatoes.
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Old February 20, 2020   #2
Black Krim
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hey, did you find a list of scab resistant potatoes???

I had a problem in 2019 with scab. Many resistant varieties.
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Old February 22, 2020   #3
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No never did. Someone said white were better than red. Another suggested growing in hay and keeping them off the ground. I will post when I find the article.
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Old February 22, 2020   #4
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I do think growing potatoes so they dont touch the soul helps as its a soil born pathogen. It is such a problem that many resistant varieties gave been developed. Need to find my notes.....
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Old February 22, 2020   #5
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a general list found on line for scab resistant potatoes....
German butterball
Keuka Gold
Elba
Blue Gold
Nicola
Carola
Salem
Mt Rose
Yukon Gem
Satina
Cheiftan
Red Maria

Did more digging by variety. Some sources contradicted other sources. " resistant" was a vague term and tried to find better details; found better info for some but not others

rose finn fingerling High scab tolerance
puruvian purple high scab tolerance
Cheiftan very high scab tolerance
Satina very high scab tolerance
BalticvRose high tolerance to common scab
keuka gold high scab tolerance
german butter ball good resistance
red gold moderate reststance to common scab
mtn rose resistant to common scab, susepable to powdery scab

purple magesty mod resist scab, md suseptible powdery scab
strawberry paw resistant to scab
Adirondack Red moderate resist to scab , child of Cheiftan
Dark Red Norland mderate resistant scab
all blue moderate resist common scab
caribe moderate resist scab
french fingerling resist to scab
austrian cresent fingerling medium scab resistance
red maria good resistance

Last edited by Black Krim; February 22, 2020 at 07:45 PM.
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Old February 22, 2020   #6
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When I grew a large plot of potatoes, yukon gold and kennebecs, one end of plot scabby and other was not. This had been a horse paddock recently with manure just a few months old, to older.

Apparently pH of soil can help. Lower pH inhibits scab but makes potatoes prone to other serious problems.

Hence the hours of collecting info on scab resistant varieties.

Seems resistence can vary by area planted, as well.

Looks like only by trial will we find what works.

Good luck !!!

Last edited by Black Krim; February 22, 2020 at 07:41 PM.
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Old February 22, 2020   #7
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This might be helpful !

http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.corne...otato_Scab.htm
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Old February 23, 2020   #8
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I have high levels of organic material in my soil which scab loves. I have tried to lower the pH with no real success. The only thing that really works for me is growing the tubers in a thick layer of straw. I grew red Norland a couple of years ago in the soil and the entire crop was a scabby mess. Kennebec was less scabby but I'm sticking to straw.
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Old February 23, 2020   #9
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Red Norland and Kennebecs dont make the cut for scab resistance as far as a I can see. Are you planting Kennebecs again, or trying a more resistant variety to compare ??Im definitely selecting more resistant varieties.


Straw sounds like a great option. Here straw is VERY VERY expensive.
I have noodled around the idea of using peat to mulch.

Given the increasing choices of resistant varieties, we are not the only growers with scab in the soil.

Last edited by Black Krim; February 23, 2020 at 09:50 AM.
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Old February 23, 2020   #10
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OMG.. . totally forgot about the russet family. Many / most are scab resistant. A few are not.

Sorry I forgot these as russetts dont grow well here, so they are not an option for me and not on my radar.
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Old February 24, 2020   #11
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Here are a few more.

Huckleberry Gold mod - hi resistance
Red Cloud high resistance

caribou russett high resistance
Butte russett very high resist
Reddale high resistance
burbank russet very high resistance
Prarie Blush moderate resist

many varieties are suseptable. I called local seed potato supplier to the area to get their list for 2020 season and
ALL are suseptable to scab.

Will be ordering seed potato from Maine Potato Lady again.
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Old February 24, 2020   #12
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I buy my seed potatoes locally and I have not seen any of those listed as scab resistant in the list above. I have grown French fingerlings but I can't remember if they got scab or not however they did not produce well so I will not be growing them again. The Kennebec were mostly scab free grown in straw and I also grew a new one last year called Yellow Lehigh which was not only mostly scab free but it has been keeping longer than the Kennebec. I will probably grow those two again this year.

Last edited by brownrexx; February 24, 2020 at 08:30 PM.
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Old February 24, 2020   #13
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In my notes, Lehigh is listed as resistant to scab. A general term I interpret as moderately but could alsi be highly resistant.
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Old February 29, 2020   #14
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In an effort to manage scab, i keep looking for info.

"How to Prevent & Control Common Potato Scab
Unlike most of the other vegetables who prefer a pH approaching neutral (7.00) potatoes are best grown in soil with a pH of 5.5 which discourages the Streptomyces Scabies bacteria and therefore the scab. Fertilising with sulphate of ammonia or superphosphate will acidify soils and should be considered for limey soils with a naturally high pH. Do not lime soil prior to planting potatoes unless the soil pH is very low, below 5.00.

Avoid excess use of nitrogen rich fertiliser such as sulphate of ammonia as over-application of nitrogen delays the onset of tuber bulking which prolongs the period that the plant is susceptible to scab.

Increasing the level of organic matter in the soil and thereby retaining moisture in the soil combined with regular watering, ideally each day for the first six weeks after planting will also reduce the severity of symptoms. Keeping the seed tuber skin wet stops the disease taking hold

Crop rotation will also assist in control of potato scab. Growing potatoes in the same place over consecutive years will build up the level of bacteria in the soil. Be aware that radishes, beets, turnips carrots and red clover are all capable of carrying common scab.

There are no chemical controls available to home growers.

Common Potato Scab Resistant Varieties
If common potato scab is persistent problem on your plot then consider growing resistant varieties of potato in addition to the control methods above. Resistant potato varieties include:

Accent
Anna
Anya
Arran Pilot
Avondale
Balmoral
Banba
Camelot
Cara
Carlingford
Carnaval
Challenger
Chaski
Chopin
Claret
Cosmos
Courlan
Druid
Electra
Ellie
Galactica
Golden Wonder
Habibi
Inca Bella
Inca Dawn
Jester
King Edward
La Strada
Lady Christl
Lanorma
Lulu
Malin
Manhattan
Mayan Gold
Mayan Queen
Mayan Twilight
Melody
Mimi
Morene
Nadine
Orchestra
Paru
Pentland Crown
Picasso
Piccolo Star
Pink Gypsy
Pizazz
Russet Burbank
Saturna
Savanna
Avoid planting varieties very susceptible to common scab
like:
Ambassador
Blue Danube
Duke Of York
Emma
Foremost
Horizon
Lady Claire
Maris Piper
Maxine
Mayan Star
Mistay
Mustang
Panther
Red Duke Of York
Rudolph
Setanta
Shelford
Smith’s Comet
Spunta
Tresdale
Ulster Chieftain
Up-to-date
Zohar
"
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Old February 29, 2020   #15
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the above is from.....

https://www.allotment-garden.org/veg...o-scab-common/
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