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Old March 14, 2019   #1
Tracydr
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Default Best “ hatch” Chile

I’d like to grow enough hatch style Chile’s this summer to roast and freeze since I don’t have access to them like I did in Arizona. What’s a good variety to gro for green Chile stews and sauces?
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Old March 15, 2019   #2
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I started growing a variety called charger 2 years ago that I am very happy with. Very thick and meaty, they roast and skin easily. Not the hottest at the start of the season but towards the end of summer they have better heat. Usually about 4 chiles to a pound, I had one last summer that weighed .45 lb.
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Old March 15, 2019   #3
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That's a big pepper.
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Old March 15, 2019   #4
Dutch
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
I’d like to grow enough hatch style Chile’s this summer to roast and freeze since I don’t have access to them like I did in Arizona. What’s a good variety to gro for green Chile stews and sauces?
Big Jim, Joe E. Parker, and the Heritage 6-4 NuMex Peppers are medium heat peppers that can be used to roast and make hatch style peppers. I believe Michael (mdvpc) posted that the Heritage 6-4 were the most common pepper used to make hatch style peppers.
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Old March 15, 2019   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
I’d like to grow enough hatch style Chile’s this summer to roast and freeze since I don’t have access to them like I did in Arizona. What’s a good variety to gro for green Chile stews and sauces?
Attached is an article about a few varieties of chile. Our favorite is the mirasol type "Mosco" grown locally here. I have grown Heritage Big Jim, Joe E Parker. Numex 6-4 and others, but the mirasol variety is the one the majority of farmers here grow. But your growing conditions may be more suitable to another type. And since chile is widely available here roasted for $30 a bushel, I use my growing space for other vegetables that aren't available. Good luck in whatever you choose.

http://roastedchili.com/green-chile-...chili-peppers/

https://burrellseeds.us
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Last edited by pondgardener; March 15, 2019 at 10:52 AM.
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Old March 15, 2019   #6
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Attached is an article about a few varieties of chile. Our favorite is the mirasol type "Mosco" grown locally here. I have grown Heritage Big Jim, Joe E Parker. Numex 6-4 and others, but the mirasol variety is the one the majority of farmers here grow. But your growing conditions may be more suitable to another type. And since chile is widely available here roasted for $30 a bushel, I use my growing space for other vegetables that aren't available. Good luck in whatever you choose.

http://roastedchili.com/green-chile-...chili-peppers/

https://burrellseeds.us

I wasn't aware of the Burrell seed company. I noticed they are in Rocky Ford which in my mind used to produce the worlds best cantaloupes along with the Pecos cantaloupes from the Pecos river valley. When I was a kid, I drove a truck every harvest season to Rocky Ford for a loads of cantaloupes and over to Grand Junction for loads of Orchard fruit. In Rocky Ford, I always bought cantaloupes from a Japanese family who consistently produced great cantaloupes. I often wonder if those areas still produce great product. I suspect most of the land has now been converted to housing developments.
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Old March 15, 2019   #7
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Mild - Numex 6-4
Medium - Big Jim
Hot - Sandia
Hotter - Miss Junie
Hottest - Lumbre
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Old March 15, 2019   #8
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I have grown Joe E. Parker a few times and will grow it again this year. I haven't grown it with other hatch chillies to compare it to, but it has been productive and great tasting. Heat is there, but more to the mild side. It would be my recommendation, unless you like a hotter hatch. I think it is about the same heat as Numex 6-4 (might be considered an improved 6-4 I believe) with Big Jim being in the same family but bigger and I have heard a little hotter, but that was just from one grower.

The plants get big and need support with the heavy peppers or the branches will snap off.
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Old March 15, 2019   #9
pondgardener
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I wasn't aware of the Burrell seed company. I noticed they are in Rocky Ford which in my mind used to produce the worlds best cantaloupes along with the Pecos cantaloupes from the Pecos river valley. When I was a kid, I drove a truck every harvest season to Rocky Ford for a loads of cantaloupes and over to Grand Junction for loads of Orchard fruit. In Rocky Ford, I always bought cantaloupes from a Japanese family who consistently produced great cantaloupes. I often wonder if those areas still produce great product. I suspect most of the land has now been converted to housing developments.
Below is a link to one of the larger farms in the Rocky Ford area. There is not a lot of land converted to houses, but quite a bit is getting dried up as more water is sucked from the area and sold to bigger metropolitan areas. The grower linked provides cantaloupes to the major grocer here in Pueblo and I usually send Carolyn137 a package of them every August.

http://hirakatafarms.com
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Old March 15, 2019   #10
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Another list,

MILD - 1904
MEDIUM- JoeParker
MED HOT- BigJim
HOT- Sandia
X-HOT. Lumbre

I started my pepper a month ago. Very slow to get going. Potted up in 4inch last week.
So get going...but you have a longer season than I, and warmer temps.

I order a 10 pound box every year and make a fermented hot sauce, some just roasted, some
sliced then frozen, some stuffed. Some dehydrated. I do get a decent harvest of other varieties
I mix in but that box keeps me in Hatch chilis all winter for various dishes.

10 lb box pre-order is 34$
https://www.hatch-green-chile.com/co...16912816636002
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Old March 31, 2019   #11
Tracydr
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Alright,I have seeds for Nu-Mex,Big Jim’s and “Anaheim,Pinetree seeds” so I started all of them.
I had a total failure on my first planting,a few issues with my new seed starting area. I’ve now fixed it up to avoid that so this batch should be fine,I hope.never had problems before but I was trying a new setup and had some wild temperature fluctuations.
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Old March 31, 2019   #12
Tracydr
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Oh,I’m from Boulder originally so I know Rocky Ford melons and western slope peaches very well. Brings back great memories.
I really miss being able to buy Stokes green Chile and freshly roasted chilies from when I lived in the west.
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Old April 29, 2019   #13
Tracydr
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So, I started the Big Jim and Pinetree seeds Anaheim. Both are doing great,I think I kept about 12 total.
I also have so many others I can’t even count. From Scotch Bonnets to Marconis and tons of others, all have been repotted and are growing well. Will start putting out in the garden next weekend. A little late but we have a long season. Should be ok,will overwinter our favorite hot ones.
I also did some black varieties-jigsaw,black Hungarian and another I can’t remember. Such beautiful plants that I think some of them will end up as potted plants around the house. I have a sun shortage so the garden is about 1/2 mile away near my barn.
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Old May 1, 2019   #14
DonDuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutch View Post
Big Jim, Joe E. Parker, and the Heritage 6-4 NuMex Peppers are medium heat peppers that can be used to roast and make hatch style peppers. I believe Michael (mdvpc) posted that the Heritage 6-4 were the most common pepper used to make hatch style peppers.
Dutch

Isn't the heritage 6-4 just a later version of the Numex big Jim? I've not grown the heritage, but I am growing the Big Jim this year along with another anaheim style called "Big Chile".


I have my fingers crossed, but I may have finally found a variety of poblano peppers which produce huge peppers like the grocery store poblanos. My poblano pepper plants are still under three feet tall, but they already have some early peppers hanging which are larger than any poblano I've ever grown. I don't remember the variety name, but I have all than information written in my shop.
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Old May 1, 2019   #15
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duplicate1 sorry
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