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Old January 31, 2008   #16
phreddy
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Originally Posted by michael johnson View Post
Goji Berries (I spelt it wrong the first time) are supposed to be the new wonder food of the century, from tibet where the locals eat them and supposidly live longer and healthier..
They are also calling them the new fruit Viagra over here, as they are supposed to do wonders for your libido too, although having said that I havnt noticed any difference in that respect and I have eat quite a lot of them already, :wink: .

The main reason people are buying them is because they contain 500 times more vitamin C than any other know fruit or substance, the dried form is a sort of orangy red look a bit like dried sultanas, and contain fine seeds, they are slightly sweet in flavour, and very expensive to buy.
In the Uk they are about £3.99 for 125 grams.
That is a 'must grow' for me this year, thanks Micheal. I came across a website that has testimonials that make this the wonderberry: anti-oxident of 30,500 units against carrots of 250, reduces blood pressure, pre-menopause problems etc. No mention of the 'V' effect though or anti-oxident value of toms.
I also noticed that they were stocked by Tesco so no running off to the seedsman.
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Old February 3, 2008   #17
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I've got both figs (Brown Turkey, Black Genoa & a couple of unnamed varieties) and goji berries (they used to be called wolfberries until the western marketers got hold of them). I've only had them since early spring - figs from cuttings and goji berry from seed. Anyway, I'm not sure how any of them will go as we get quite harsh winters (-15°C) and I have heavy clay soil. I've taken note of your experiences Frank.
One of the figs is from a local tree which does extremely well so I'm hopeful there. I've never noticed seed in any locally grown figs. Have a read here (http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/fig.html) for the odd tale of fig pollination.
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Old February 10, 2008   #18
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just did a quick sus with google and here's where one can find the Goji beries down under..
http://www.gojiberryaustralia.com.au...%20PRICES.html
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Old February 11, 2008   #19
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I have now discovered that they are well known here in Malaysia. Used in cooking but regarded as something of luxury. Shops are out of stock at the moment due to Chinese New Year - Gong Xi Fa Cai everyone!!!
I will let you know when I get some, how they come and maybe if they can be posted????
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Old March 1, 2008   #20
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Lycium barbarum - Boxthorn, Wolfberry, Goji Berry - this species is very usual here (Bulgaria) and is used as hedge. No one eats the fruits (taste is nothing special), but it seems that the local plants are not so productive as the varieties grown in China.
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Old August 16, 2008   #21
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I tried this as well. Learned last year that pineapple guava are indeed easy from seed. My seedlings dried out and died tho, so im on my second round of trying! had a few Goji sprout, one looks good and was potted up, ill try another round probably this week. theyll come in this winter. I may keep them in pots for a few years.
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Old August 16, 2008   #22
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I am thinking of growing dwarf mango in a container so that I can move it indoors.

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Old August 17, 2008   #23
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I had no idea there were dwarf mango! we had some Atufalo mango seeds sprout in the vermicompost bin and i let one get a few leaves on it.

I just read they get really big and they would prefer being larger plants. Someone sent me a Naranjilla that I let go, it never set fruit, ive got a 2nd year Barbados cherry I hope will set this year, and tried figs a few times last year, but TN was really dry...

I would love to hear about any manageable unusual fruits!
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Old August 17, 2008   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garnetmoth View Post
I had no idea there were dwarf mango! we had some Atufalo mango seeds sprout in the vermicompost bin and i let one get a few leaves on it. --------------------!
Supposedly, these are grafted dwarf varieties. Still they can grow to over 8' tall.

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Old August 24, 2008   #25
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Neat. pictures if it works?
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Old March 3, 2009   #26
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Pineapple guava: I don't have space to grow it, but when I see one in bloom I love the fleshy white flower petals -- really good flavor.

Several other plants in the Myrtaceae family grow around here and have good fruits -- if I know a plant in my neighborhood is fruiting, I plan my dog-walking route to pass by and eat one or two, as long as I'm reasonably sure that the yard hasn't been sprayed with poisons. No one except birds and other wildlife eat them!

Myrtle is most common, has resinous-tasting small black fruit. Usually planted as a hedge.

Luma has sweeter fruits, also small and dark (but the one tree in my neighborhood was cut down a couple months ago!). It's a large shrub or can be pruned as a lovely small tree.

Ugni tastes sort of like a resinous blueberry, very pleasant. Makes a nice low hedge.
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Old March 4, 2009   #27
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Chicago Hardy is a great fig for folks with cold winters. It'll survive zone 5 winters, dying to ground (benefitting from a nice mulching with straw or leaves) & then come up in the spring. We have Brown Turkey & Celestes all over the place down here. I would love to get ahold of a dark fig (?Sicilian or LSU purple) that sets fruit twice a summer (light then heavy) b/c everbearings never produce enough at once to do anything with other than compete with the birds (grrrr... that mockingbird who takes a single bite of the figs & my yellow or orange maters...grrrr).
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Old March 22, 2012   #28
stonysoilseeds
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i love figs and and just bought a chicago hardy fig from loews i am hoping to plant it nrar my vegetable plot.. can anyone reccomend the best way of winter protecting it thanks
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Old March 23, 2012   #29
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Lucky ducky you are! I wish our Lowes qoukd stock these! Just heap fallen leaves around the base in the fall - like a foot or more. Remember to uncover in early spring.

Last edited by stormymater; March 23, 2012 at 12:10 AM. Reason: qoukd = would
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Old March 23, 2012   #30
phreddy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stonysoilseeds View Post
i love figs and and just bought a chicago hardy fig from loews i am hoping to plant it nrar my vegetable plot.. can anyone reccomend the best way of winter protecting it thanks
I can only tell you that in Bulgaria the figs are just left without and other action. Back they come in spring, rather late though. Makes me think that I have lost it but in time back it comes.
Have been told I should reduce the regrowth to three or so 'branches'. I am having ten new plants made this year. One just digs or even pulls a 'sapling' away from the main plant. Put it in the ground and water it well until it roots properly.
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