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Old July 3, 2012   #31
Crandrew
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The same kind of person I wouldn't even care to know or get along with.

You let someone tell me they hate cats and its all over with me.

Worth
Worth I think we might need to E-Break Up.
I HATE OUTDOOR CATS! Between my neighbors they have at a minimum 6 outdoor cats. For the past 7 years these cats use my sand yard as a litter box. Do you know what its like to pick up 6 cats crap, none of which belong to you? Yeah so im not sure if I hate cats or cat owners but I hate something I know that!!!

My Rational thought breakdown:
-Dogs are required by city law to be on a leash.
-Owners are required to pick up Dog crap in my neighborhood.
-Dog Owners are held liable for any attacks or damage done to other people or property.
-Cats are allowed to run wild
-Cats are allowed to crap in my yard without any consequence
-I feel like im taking CRAZY pills.
-Cat owners think im crazy for having issues with their animals defecating over 150lbs a year in my garden.


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Old July 3, 2012   #32
habitat_gardener
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...I have a clumping timber bamboo that can get to 70 feet tall and 4 inches around....
I visited a landscape designer's backyard in San Jose, Calif., that had lots of timber bamboo, 4-6 inches diameter and over 30 ft. high, maybe taller (I didn't know the variety). Much taller than the one-story bungalow (+ the front porch was 8-12 ft. above ground level, so more like a story and a half). They were spaced far enough apart so you could easily walk through in any direction without feeling they were in the way, but close enough to provide shade.

His website shows some bamboo photos, but I don't see any photos of the backyard timber bamboo I recall wandering through. The water features are in the front yard. It's a tiny house and a small garden, with oversize blocks of stone and ornament. I also don't see the outdoor kitchen, with the huge gas-powered wok, in those photos.
http://www.forristt.com/livingportfolio.html
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Old July 4, 2012   #33
Tom Atillo
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Default Humane Cat Detterence

Reply to Crandrew:
I love both dogs and cats but I know how bad it is to find "Kitty Almond Roca" where you grow your food. My solution was to buy a device that links a water sprinkler to a motion detector.........(I can hear your sinister giggling already).
This device is highly effective against cats but not squirrels (they apparently appreciate a random shower much more than the cats do).
This unit is called Scarecrow (model cro-101).
Contech Electronics Inc.
P.O. Box 115
Saanichton B C V8M 2C3
I think they still sell on Ebay.

Another solution could be a dog or a good neighbor/cat owner who would place a pile of sand (as a enticing cat box) on their own property to keep their critters off of yours.
Good luck!
Tom Attilla

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Old July 4, 2012   #34
Worth1
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We're. Even Crandrew.

I hate the ocean and beaches as much as you hate cats.

Now give me a good cat and a river to sit by, now that is truly heaven.

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Old July 6, 2012   #35
meadowyck
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Ok, I'm a bamboo lover, running if I had the acreas, but only the good tasting shoot producers kinds, and love love the clumpers. I also love the oceans, and glad I'm back home.
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Old July 6, 2012   #36
Worth1
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Ok, I'm a bamboo lover, running if I had the acreas, but only the good tasting shoot producers kinds, and love love the clumpers. I also love the oceans, and glad I'm back home.
Babmboo oldhamii is one of the best eating bamboos it is a clumper and would grow great in Florida.


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Old July 6, 2012   #37
kurt
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Babmboo oldhamii is one of the best eating bamboos it is a clumper and would grow great in Florida.


Worth
http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/scie...ooshoo5334.cfm
I don't know of which ones but be careful.
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Old July 7, 2012   #38
Worth1
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http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/scie...ooshoo5334.cfm
I don't know of which ones but be careful.
Kurt as I said before Bamboo is a grass with 1000's of species.
And like a grass I am sure some you can eat and others are not so edible.

Bambusa Oldhamii is one of the most prized species of bamboo in parts of Asia to eat.

I can assure you I do my research before I suggest edible plants to eat.
I do thank you for your concern though.
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...mP8b4w&cad=rja


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Old July 7, 2012   #39
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Out of curiosity, if you're trying to get rid of bamboo, why not roundup or brush killer or something? Why just try to dig it? Or is it so tough it is impervious...?
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Old July 7, 2012   #40
ron bruce
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Good question. I've got a beautiful clumping bamboo surrounded by invasive types (wanted to see if they'd grow here... YES) so now I've got to dig them out but I may resort to chemical control if I must.
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Old July 7, 2012   #41
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Out of curiosity, if you're trying to get rid of bamboo, why not roundup or brush killer or something? Why just try to dig it? Or is it so tough it is impervious...?
Imagine a clump(non invasive) that was 10 x 10 square and had 40-60ft poles.It was affecting the growth of two cushman(prize)mango trees by blocking the sun to them.The root ball was at least 4-6 foot deep and the roots found the water table(3-4ft season dependent).If left untrimmed the older poles do die and turn into ugly falling over dead leaf masses.If you cut the poles the center of clump will produce smaller side shoot plant growth and only a couple of new towering poles will emerge.Also we have and never will use chemicals in the garden since we have such a shallow water table here in S Florida.I could go on and on about chemical ferts and pesticides but that would be a opening for another debate that I will not get into.Just call me old school, natural,organic,biological control gardner.
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Old July 7, 2012   #42
meadowyck
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tam

running bamboo is rather hard and the older the plant the harder it will be to get rid of. However, for those that have a neighbor who didn't do their work before planting it, you can just mow it down when you see the shoot. Running bamboo can send a runner out as far away as 25-40 feet, this is why it can take over a neighbor in a few season, especially if it is a tropical being grown in the tropical areas of the US. When tropicals are grown in northern climate it isn't as invasive due to the cold keeping it more in check.

I have a black runner bamboo but it is confined to a pot, this way my neighbor will still love having me as their neighbor...LOL

oldhamii does have one of the better tasting shoots and many folks grow this runner in order to harvest the shoots. The best flavor of the shoots is when you first see them break ground to cover with a black pot, once it reaches the height of the pot (you will see the pot hanging above the ground as the shoot has lifted it off the ground) take the pot off and dig below ground level, pop the shoot bring inside and peel off outer coverings, many ways to eat, grilled broiled or in a pot of good chicken broth. Yummy.

If you live in warmer climates and still love the runners then yes most certainly place a bearer down to keep it in check, then you and your neighbors are happy.

I forgot to add that by limited the new shoots from sunlight increases the sweetness of the shoot.
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Last edited by meadowyck; July 7, 2012 at 12:21 PM. Reason: to add one comment
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Old July 7, 2012   #43
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Oldhamii is not a runner.
If you have one that is a runner it is not Oldhamii and was mislabeled.

Worth.

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Last edited by Worth1; July 7, 2012 at 02:13 PM. Reason: Had edit because of cell phone thumbs.
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Old July 16, 2012   #44
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Tracy, chemicals DO NOT KILL BAMBOO. Trust me, I have spent 10 years trying everything under the sun. I've never seen a plant like it, ever! It spreads by runners under ground, and it is woody, not herbaceous. We even tried something my ex husband said was "agent orange" way back then and that didn't do a thing. If you miss one little piece of a runner (it must be dug up) it will root and run again. I thought I've dug it all up over and over and over and it comes back. This is on a hillside, not a flat area, so it's a real b****h to dig it out and try and hold your feet steady on the ground. I curse my neighbors all the time for ever planting it. One year the husband came over and told me he got rid of it for me. HA! He cut it to the ground, which made it impossible for me to find and it kept on running. EVIL EVIL EVIL plant.

Actually it is on the invasive species list, and I know a lot of folks have planted it in their yards, and some park-like settings, only to regret it later on. I would never even put it in a pot in my yard, that's how much I hate it now.
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Old July 16, 2012   #45
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interesting, i've never noticed this issue. my parents had bambo planted along the fence in my home country (it's good for privacy) and it was never out of control, i really dont remember the name, but the leaves are small and the plants could grow higher than the house. and it was barrier secured by stones as well. bamboo is very common as tree fence over there.
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