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Old September 1, 2013   #1
marc_groleau
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Default Time to Ripening Determined by Pollen Donor?

I recently crossed Cherokee Purple with Pineapple. In one case, I used Pineapple as the pollen donor and in the other, I used CH Purple as the pollen donor. In the F1 result, the time to ripening of the Pineapple pollen donor matched a typical Pineapple plant and the Cherokee Purple pollen donor matched that of a typical CH Purple plant. Was this to be expected? is time to ripening dictated by the pollen donor or is it hit or miss?
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Old October 1, 2013   #2
emcd124
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wow, interesting. following
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Old October 1, 2013   #3
GunnarSK
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Yes, sure it's interesting. Don't know if there's any "conventional wisdom".
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Old October 5, 2013   #4
bower
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marc,

Just wondering what is the time to ripening for CP vs for Pineapple?

I have a couple of crosses started here, where the pollen donor had a very short ripening time (31 days from pea sized set to ripe) compared to the female parents (47 and 49 days). If the fruit ripen and I get seed, I'll be sure to let you know the results next year.

But maybe someone will answer the question before then?
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Old October 10, 2013   #5
PaddyMc
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Now that is interesting. Did you do more than one plant from each cross? Did the fruit seem relatively the same other than DTM? Pics? Great cross by the way, what are you hoping to see from it?
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Old October 10, 2013   #6
marc_groleau
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PaddyMc View Post
Now that is interesting. Did you do more than one plant from each cross? Did the fruit seem relatively the same other than DTM? Pics? Great cross by the way, what are you hoping to see from it?
Really just interested in what would result from crossing such different lines. Not only do parents have distinct color traits but also flavor of each parent couldn't be more in contrast. The result was large productive plants with very large deep pink fruit. The taste of F1s is probably closer to Pineapple than CH purple. Very meaty and not a lot of seeds. 2 plants of each cross. See pictures of both outcomes at the link below.
http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=29755
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Old October 11, 2013   #7
bower
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Marc, you might find the attached paper interesting, especially the introduction which summarizes past findings at the time (1992).

"Powers and Lyon (1941) divided earliness into three stages: 1) days from
sowing to anthesis, 2) days from anthesis to first fruit set, and
3) days from first fruit set to first ripe fruit. They concluded
that there was sufficient variation within these stages to consider
each a unique and heritable trait
." This has been borne out by present day molecular studies, notably Lindhout et al (1994), identified 3 distinct loci corresponding to the three defined stages. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF00022528

The intro attached below also talks about the dominance of earliness, and says " The F1 hybrid mean for earliness closely resembles that of the early parent and is often significantly earlier than the late parent (Corbeil, 1964; Daubeny, 1961; Honma
et al., 1963; Lyon, 1941; Powers and Lyon, 1941; Tayel et al.,1959).
" That would be most noticeable where there's a big difference in earliness of the parents.

There's been lots of research on the "sowing to anthesis" stage, but most everything I've found has rolled the second two stages into one instead of looking at them separately. Maybe there are reciprocal dominance effects in one of those stages that hasn't been noticed because of the overall dominance of earliness traits.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Kemble-Gardner-CornellCherry92.pdf (79.6 KB, 11 views)
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Old October 11, 2013   #8
marc_groleau
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Wow great info. Thank you very much.
Did you see the photos. Vey similar fruit in every way but ripening time. Can't wait for F2 rusults. Going to try to get a lot more planted
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Old October 11, 2013   #9
bower
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Yeah they look delicious, Marc !!!! Breeding experiments.. lots of fun !
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #10
hl2601
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Bumping this-
Marc did you ever stabilize this cross? Sounded like it could be super tasty!
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