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Old November 25, 2016   #31
loulac
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I receive a news bulletin sent by Vilmorin Co to shareholders and learnt a few things in the latest edition. There are nine species of wild tomatoes :
L esculentum var.cerasiforme,
Solanum peruvianum
Solanum pimpinenellifolliom
L. parviflorum, L. chmielewskii
L cheesmanii
Solanum lycopersicoides
L chilense
Solanum penellii
Solanum habrochaites
Each species brings specific qualities. I suppose Joseph knows them all and makes use of their different qualities. He quotes S. corneliomulleri, did Vilmorin forget it ?

I learnt too that every year more than 250 new varieties are on sale in the world. How many will still be on sale in 10 years ?

Last edited by loulac; November 25, 2016 at 01:39 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old November 25, 2016   #32
carolyn137
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No Vilmorin didn't forget it but the name has been changed which apparently they aren't aware of.

https://www.google.com/search?q=s.co..._AUIBygA&dpr=1

Notice the first link.

Keith Mueller is up to date on taxonomy

http://kdcomm.net/~tomato/Tomato/tax.html

And everyone should know about Keith's website which is an absolute treasure

http://www.kdcomm.net/~tomato/

Take a look at the well known tomato varieties that Keith has bred and what he's been working on. As well as all the great links,how to cross tomatoes,what is segregation all about,etc.

Keith got his degree with Dr.Randolf Gardner,known worldwide for all the varieties he has bred.Randy is/was at the NCSU Experimental station,and I call hime Randy since I've known him well for a long time and trialed several of his new ones. Fusion also knows him.

https://www.google.com/search?q=dr+r..._AUIBygA&dpr=1

Randy is now retired,but is still breeding tomatoes.He spends winters in NC and summers at his old family farm in Virginia.

I was so pleased to see he was here at Tville yesterday,so I Pmed him and asked for an update.Each year I send him an electronic card from England and there was one he especially loved,me too,of a young boy playing a violin, so I told him I'd send it again for Xmas.Randy plays the violin, well, it's bigger than a standard violin but I forget the name.

Easier to PM than fetch his em addy.

Caroly, 77, and still not in heaven.
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Old November 25, 2016   #33
dmforcier
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Viola.
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Old November 25, 2016   #34
carolyn137
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Viola.
Could be.He sent me a picture of it.

Thanks,

Carolyn
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Old November 25, 2016   #35
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I would be interested in the wild varieties of chilies they have.
I have read that the habanero goes at least back to Mayan times.

Worth
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Old November 25, 2016   #36
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Quote:
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I would be interested in the wild varieties of chilies they have.
I have read that the habanero goes at least back to Mayan times.

Worth
Origin of different peppers.

First some pictures

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...k1.JFIcmymg5jw

And now the links

https://www.google.com/search?q=orig..._AUIBygA&dpr=1

Carolyn
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Old November 25, 2016   #37
joseph
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A few years ago, Solanum peruvianum was split into 4 species: S. arcanum, S. huaylasense, S. peruvianum, and S. corneliomulleri.
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Old November 26, 2016   #38
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Big thanks for the rich information given by all the suggested links. I’ll have plenty of time to explore them with the cold season. I’ve just made good use of the technique telling us how to bring tomatoes to maturity in the home. My tomatoes have been hit by the first frost of November and I picked up all the fruit that looked intact. I would never have thought of bringing ethylene with apples.

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Caroly, 77, and still not in heaven.
There’s no hurry at all. Most people are sailing in the same boat, so am I. You make me think of the song "Everybody wants to go to Heaven but nobody wants to die" sung here by Loretta Lyn : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjF3fGRPXtg
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Old November 26, 2016   #39
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Originally Posted by joseph View Post
A few years ago, Solanum peruvianum was split into 4 species: S. arcanum, S. huaylasense, S. peruvianum, and S. corneliomulleri.
Thanks for the update to the last update to the update that started all of this.

I wonder how much genus and species names get through to others.What I mean by that is that there's a taxonomy association for the US, and then there's one for Europe,I forget the name.

But if you look at different websites,vendors,etc.,you'll still see Lycopersicon (um)in Europe esculentum being used.

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Old November 26, 2016   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loulac View Post
Big thanks for the rich information given by all the suggested links. I’ll have plenty of time to explore them with the cold season. I’ve just made good use of the technique telling us how to bring tomatoes to maturity in the home. My tomatoes have been hit by the first frost of November and I picked up all the fruit that looked intact. I would never have thought of bringing ethylene with apples.


There’s no hurry at all. Most people are sailing in the same boat, so am I. You make me think of the song "Everybody wants to go to Heaven but nobody wants to die" sung here by Loretta Lyn : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjF3fGRPXtg
And here's one for you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVvGEBDioHg

Carolyn
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Old January 3, 2017   #41
FredB
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I have been trying various interspecies crosses, and my experience is similar to Joseph's.

Crosses that didn't work for me: arcanum, corneliomulleri, pennellii, peruvianum. In each case I used Brandywine as the male parent and the wild species as the female parent. The peruvianum cross produced fruit, but the F1 seemed to be sterile. Several of these crosses have been successfully carried out at research centers (google "TGRC introgression" for examples), but they seem to require more skill or persistence than I could bring to bear.

Crosses that did work:

S. pimpinellifolium. This one is easy. The success rate is about the same as what you get when crossing two varieties of domestic tomato. Some interesting properties of the F1 and beyond include intense red or pink color, intense flavor, high sugar content, and partial resistance to leaf and root diseases. I'm still trying to stabilize combinations of these features.

S. galapagense. A relative of S. pimpinellifolium, with tiny yellow fruit, frilly leaves, and a strong "burning garbage" smell to the foliage. The F1 fruit have a funky taste, but you can select that out in the F2 or F3 generation. I haven't noticed any special disease resistance, and overall this cross seems less interesting than the S. pim cross.

S. habrochaites. I got one successful cross out of about 40 tries. I used the habrochaites flower as the female, and I think the very long pistil is very sensitive to damage during emasculation. I tried crossing using intact female flowers in the greenhouse where there aren't any pollinating insects, and several of the attempted crosses took, but I won't know until this summer whether they are out-crosses or just self-crosses.

First, I'll explain why I'm interested in habrochaites, and then I'll describe the results of the cross.

A few years ago, just for fun, I tried growing out one of the rootstock tomato varieties, Emperador Hybrid. It was clearly habrochaites, not lycopersicum. Typical habrochaites characteristics included fuzzy leaves and stems, characteristic habrochaites smell, and large flowers with orange anther cones and long exserted stigmas. The fruits were round, 3/4", green when ripe, and were sweet but with a woody texture and flavor. The plant was huge, with a 1" stem, and it kept growing rampantly until frost, while my heirlooms and hybrids usually died by the end of August. It was totally impervious to septoria leaf spot, and had partial resistance to early blight. I figured it could be a good source of disease resistance.

Emperador Hybrid seems to be a cross between two habrochaites lines. The F2 plants were all clearly habrochaites, but they varied in stem and foliage color, hairiness, and early blight resistance. Since then, I've grown out several other Syngenta rootstocks and they all seem to be habrochaites (Arnold, Colossal, DRO 141TX, Estamino, Maxifort). They differ slightly in a few characteristics such as purple coloration of the stems, but they are all very similar. They all have rampant growth and appear to be completely resistant to septoria leaf spot. DRO 141TX seemed to have the best early blight resistance, so I am going to focus on using it as a parent in future crosses.

My successful cross had an F3 offspring of Emperador Hybrid as the female parent and Brandywine as the male. The foliage looked like lycopersicum but smelled like habrochaites. Out of four plants, two died in August and two survived until frost, so there seems to be some heterogeneity in disease resistance. Although Emperador fuit are green/yellow and Brandywine is pink, the F1 fruit were orange. I presume each parent was defective in a different step of the pathway for orange coloration, which would mean that the F1 would have all the necessary enzymes and thus could make orange pigment. The fruit are about the size of a golf ball and are netted like a muskmelon (see photo below). They are edible but the taste is a bit odd. At this point I have F2 seed and plan to select for a combination of edibility and disease resistance.

The fruit shown in the attachment are immature and don't demonstrate the full orange color.

Fred
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Old January 3, 2017   #42
Cole_Robbie
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Nice work, Fred.
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