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Old November 18, 2020   #1
Brent M
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Default Exciting New Tomato

Hi all. It's been a while, but I'm ready for the second release. I have much more to share and am certainly much more informed than 3 years ago. Like then, I'm open to full discussion and will answer honestly to the best of my knowledge. I still believe there's many folks here with lots of expertise who I can have great conversations with. And others just because I like talking about it. Without further ado, here's the first of many videos to come: https://youtu.be/Gs0vuxU4w3c
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Old November 26, 2020   #2
Greatgardens
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That's interesting! I've grown Burpee's Sweet Seedless variety several times. I really didn't expect a lot, but was pleasantly surprised by the plant and taste.
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Old November 26, 2020   #3
Fred Hempel
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Do you have to propagate your tomato clonally? Or are there certain condiditons under which it makes seeds?
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Old November 28, 2020   #4
Brent M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Hempel View Post
Do you have to propagate your tomato clonally? Or are there certain condiditons under which it makes seeds?
I've got several lines stemming from the original mutant. They are propagated by seeds. They produce when pollen is viable and are seedless when pollen isn't viable or if the flower isn't pollinated for any reason. For example, if humidity is too high for pollen, the temps are too hot for pollen, or too cold for pollen, no seeds. Remove the stigma (female tip) and they're seedless. Emasculate the flower, seedless. The plants set tomatoes almost always. There are times they don't. For example, the cultivar "Madison" of mine produces well over 100 and sometimes 200 flowers per truss. A tomato doesn't form on all of those flowers. Other lines with heavy production will produce a small ovary that will remain small until the plant feeds and matures many others then it will begin to grow.
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