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Old December 28, 2009   #16
Fusion_power
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As a mathematician friend of mine would say, Now you are beginning to appreciate the problem because you are asking the right question.

I suggest you get Bloody Butcher and Gregori's Altai just for starters and then work from there for some other colors. I will suggest Dr. Wyche as a possible for a yellow tomato but only because I have had them come in at 65 days. This is significantly earliery than most others. Manyel is a smaller yellow tomato that could also do duty as a reasonably early maturing fruit.

DarJones
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Old December 29, 2009   #17
AZRuss
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I'd second the nod to Grub's Mystery Green. You can get them cheaply (under $3 for at least 25 seeds) from Sand Hill Preservation Center, and if you order $10 or more in seeds, the shipping is free. Otherwise, shipping is $2. You can't find cheaper than that.
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Old December 29, 2009   #18
AZRuss
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Also, even though you're way up north and I'm in the desert southwest, we have similar limitations: a short growing season. I'd add Moskvich, Gary'O Sena and Break O' Day to your list--all under 72 days. I prefer the flavor of Bloody Butcher to Stupice for super earlies (although hot Stupice juice is to die for). I'm not entirely wild about yellows, but if you want one, the hybrid Lemon Boy would be my recommendation. Azoychka is a little earlier, but much less tasty IMO.
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Old December 30, 2009   #19
jungseed
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Ok, new totally improved list

Black Krim (69 day)
Grub's Mystery Green (55-70 day) thanks for the seed and offers of seed on this one Tomatovillians
Bloody Butcher (55 day)
Kimberley (50-55 day)
Sungold (cherry)

I would really like one big slicer. I really like it when one thick slice covers the bread on my BLT. Does anyone have any experience with Anna Russian? It's a 65-70 day large tomato.

I had one Lemon Boy plant last year. Had a nice green, starting to turn a bright yellow tomato on it, but an animal got it before I did. Maybe this year I will pick all my fruit when they start to turn color instead of waiting for them to ripen on the vine. I have been reading that it will not affect the taste noticably. Is that true?

Ruth
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Old December 30, 2009   #20
rhynes_boomer
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Hi Everyone,

Yet, more new kinds of tomato's! I wanted to ask if there is a place to go that you can see pictures and read about that type of tomato you are looking for? I would like to see Grub's Mystery Green sounds yummy! but, Yet again it is new to me, WHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!

Kat
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Old December 30, 2009   #21
jungseed
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Go to the members website thread and look at Tatiana's Tomatobase. You'll see pictures and get alot of info there.
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Old December 30, 2009   #22
AZRuss
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Ruth, finding a huge, early and--keyword--flavorful slicer will be tough work! Best I can think of is the hybrid Big Beef at 73 DTM. It gets largely favorable reviews in the forums. I'm growing it for the first time this year. Your Black Krims can get fairly large and are terrific on sandwiches, but I wouldn't bet on 69 days unless soil and growing conditions are close to perfect. At least a week more, but that's not bad.
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Old December 30, 2009   #23
habitat_gardener
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jungseed View Post
I had one Lemon Boy plant last year. Had a nice green, starting to turn a bright yellow tomato on it, but an animal got it before I did. Maybe this year I will pick all my fruit when they start to turn color instead of waiting for them to ripen on the vine. I have been reading that it will not affect the taste noticably. Is that true?
Ruth
Look for this summer's thread on something like "picking at first blush." I started doing this the one year when the birds and squirrels were sampling my tomatoes (they've hardly touched them since! the humans are a bigger problem at the community garden), and as far as I can tell, it doesn't make much difference. The red/pink ones seem especially susceptible to predation when they're the only ones close to ripening.
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Old December 31, 2009   #24
barefootgardener
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jungseed, I am in zone 4b , have short growing season and have been growing ARGG for the past 6 years. This is one of my favorite tomatoes and it is luscious and large. Great on a sandwich..I start from seed in late March and the plants are around a foot tall to 18 inches when set out. They are a late season tomato but always ripen for me before the end of growing season/ first hard frost..Some years I have gotten ten large tomatoes off one plant and some years maybe only 5 or so..every year is different..I grew over ten different varieties of Large Heirloom tomatoes (2009) and this is the only one that ripened for me..Outside of cherry tomatoes , I had a bad garden year for tomatoes. This tomato is worth it for me even if I only get one ripe one..I love it that much!

I have not tried Grubs Mystery Green (someday), so cannot compare..Good luck!
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Old December 31, 2009   #25
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Now I'm confused. I see you all talking about quick ripening varieties, which leads me to think the dtm is different than what my understanding of it is. She said she plants out June 1 and has till Oct. 7th. By my reckoning thats 98 days. So why the short season varieties? what am I missing? Is dtm reckoned from transplant? Or germination? Or.......?
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Old January 1, 2010   #26
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Yote, actually she said she got snow on Oct. 7th. But decent development after mid-September in my area and further north yet, is not possible in outdoor conditions. By early September, we expect to have normal daytime temps to be only in the 60's, and 70's are a real bonus when they can stretch into several weeks. In bad years we might have frosts in early September.Of course there are fluctuations every year so we hope for the best.

Remember the quality of weather determines your success, not just how many days are frost-free. If your summer high temps are cloudy and in the low to mid 70's F (low 20's C) you will not get the same rate of growth as if they were consistently in the 80's (28+C) and had full sun most days. This is why DTM's can only indicate whether a tomato tends to be early, mid-season, or long and not as a true life measurement for all growing zones. More important is GDD (Growing Degree Days) which have some good discussions here.

http://tomatoville.com/showthread.ph...&highlight=GDD

http://tomatoville.com/showthread.ph...ght=heat+units
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Old January 1, 2010   #27
Wi-sunflower
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Yes, the Days is just a guidline.

It also depends on what catalog you look at. The same variety listed in Totally Tomatoes may have a completely different "days" listed in Territorial which is out in the PNW where they don't get hot summers. Except for in 09 that is.

In 09 the PNW got the kind of summer we usually get here in the Mid-West and we (in Wisconsin anyway) got a PNW type of no-heat summer. If you can find a state ag site that follows the corn crop, that will usually give you the growing degree days for your area. In general that will be a better indicator of how your season is.

Hopefully this coming summer will be more like "normal" for the areas we all live in.

Carol
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