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Old July 28, 2016   #1
My Foot Smells
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Default Shade Cloth ?

I have some shade cloth but have never used it, really don't have the setup to properly secure it at this time. Pop up storms have brought 60+ mph winds and things get ranshackled quickly. I learnt my lesson after several patio umbrellas were destroyed. You have to batten things down like a sail on the open sea. The arches will have concrete feet.

But I am envisioning getting some arches for some new beds (for maters) that I can toss up a shade cloth to block out the harsh west setting sun and overhead afternoon. I get way too much sun Ju, Jul, Aug. & esp. as the garden grows to a completely open area.

The shade cloth will allow me to apply during the hottest months, but remove during the more temperate months.

I'm not really sure what strength cloth I would need. 40% maybe? IDK.

The current garden area has some protection with the exception of two beds that get abused on the west side.

Guess when I put the garden in, I took "full sun" too literally. Maybe full sun is o.k. if you live in Canada..

Does anyone here utilize shade cloth and can provide picture or details of successful use?
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Old July 28, 2016   #2
kath
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I use white 40% shade cloth here and there when I need it; sometimes to shade peppers or tomato plants to prevent sunscald, to grow lettuce, spinach and brassicas when it's too hot, etc. Last week I sowed carrots, lettuce and beets and laid the shade cloth directly on top of the soil before watering the beds thoroughly and got great germination in only a few days.

Guess we don't have serious winds often enough for it to be a concern here, because I just weigh the edges down with bricks or attach it to cages or hoops with clothespins. The width of mine is only 4'; not sure how large your arches are going to be.
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Old July 28, 2016   #3
Ricky Shaw
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Shade cloth is in my future too, I'm making big changes next year.

This looks good, white weave 40% , 6ft wide and cut to length, $1.40ft USD

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/p...th/shade-cloth
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Old July 28, 2016   #4
Ricky Shaw
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And these clip-on grommets look like a very handy accessory for securing with bungees or twine.

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/c...th-accessories
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Old July 28, 2016   #5
Cole_Robbie
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Shade is an idea, and therefore there are always going to be a multitude of ways to accomplish it. I would probably try the cheapest stuff I could find first, before I moved on to the real stuff, like maybe an auctioned bulk lot of old sheets from a hotel or hospital.

The best shade I have made for my greenhouse is buckets of mud thrown on it. I have to re-apply after every rain, but it is free and effective.
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Old July 28, 2016   #6
My Foot Smells
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like the bucket of mud idea, however, I am out of the greenhouse in may and even wide open that guy runs around 150+ degrees. I convert greenhouse into storage in the late spring, summer, early fall, and then use for plant storage in the winter, and start with seedlings in march after germin' underneath a lamp in the house.

I have ordered some cloth from the megastore before and have been pleased. that was a foil total eclipse, but found out the rats like that stuff and they ended up making a bunch of whoopee in the folded shade cloth (aluminet).

grommets, have to go with the sewn in brass grom myself. any kind of clip out ain't going to make it out here. the wind whips and does a lot of yanking. had a big yard party one time and renting a canvas tent. the guy was extremely particular about his tent pitchin' - I offered to help (being prior service and have put up my fair share), but he declined. Mid-summer, a t-storm came swoopin' down off the mtn. across our valley and ripped that dude to shreds.

the arches have not been purchased, but saw where a guy was selling sets (one arch-2pc) for 35$ (inc. anchor - which is a pipe you pound in ground). the arch was 1 5/8" dia. don't know - but do know no pvc - that won't make it one season. want to make it classy and longstanding.

glad to hear the 40% is popular, that is what I was thinking as well. thanks for the replies. this is still in the early planning stage, but fall for me is best - as you know - spring is a very busy time of year.
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Old July 28, 2016   #7
Barb_FL
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I bought this in 12 x 12 in 2013. I used it over raised beds and anchored it with the bungee loops they sell. It isn't dark at all.

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/p...th/shade-cloth


I also bought several of these in Sandstone and use daily now to protect peppers by clipping them over tomato cages when the sun gets really intense. I bought these pre 2013 and they have held up really well.

I've cut several of the 15' lengths and never had any unraveling. http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/p...15/shade-cloth

I've also cut to cover the Aeration Screen in an EB so the mix doesn't fall into the reservoir and keep reusing the same ones after washing it off.

---
One year I tried burlap and it didn't last more than a couple of months in our intense sun. In the long run, the Shade-Roll was way cheaper.
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Old July 28, 2016   #8
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Tents have to keep out rain. Shade cloth doesn't. If you break it up into smaller pieces, the wind will blow through them, instead of tearing everything down.

I'm thinking of something like a streamer tape, wrapped over adjacent hoops. It doesn't have to be perfect to be effective.
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Old July 28, 2016   #9
My Foot Smells
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thanks for the testimony and alternative uses. seems like the megastore is the logically place to purchase.

I have used burlap as a liner with buckets before and also would not recommend. not necessarily due to the quick breakdown of the material, but I had a black widow infestation that liked to nest in the burlap/dirt (IKR!!!!). The burlap sacks still sit in the rafters of my shop, I'm kinda scared to even tough them now after getting a major case of the heebie-jeebies!! Knock on wood, I've never been bitten by a BW.

black widow_opt.jpg

Last edited by My Foot Smells; July 28, 2016 at 03:42 PM.
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Old July 28, 2016   #10
My Foot Smells
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
Tents have to keep out rain. Shade cloth doesn't. If you break it up into smaller pieces, the wind will blow through them, instead of tearing everything down.

I'm thinking of something like a streamer tape, wrapped over adjacent hoops. It doesn't have to be perfect to be effective.
True. No need for any kind of weatherproof apparatus. The shade cloth should allow enuff wind to pass without becoming a sail. Any material that is knit too tight, WILL find it's way loose - just a matter of time.
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Old July 28, 2016   #11
Cole_Robbie
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Heck, even my black plastic mulch would work. It blocks too much light, but I would just leave gaps between the pieces. You could use material that blocked 100% of the light, and just leave gaps. Boards or strips of plywood would work.

4' orange plastic construction fence is 40 cents a foot new. That might work as well. Getting some old stuff for free would be even better.

Last edited by Cole_Robbie; July 28, 2016 at 03:50 PM.
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Old July 28, 2016   #12
Starlight
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I use a cheese cloth type material. I received a roll that was like 10' x 100'. This is like year 5 for it. Getting a few holes in places but still works great. We have been in the mid and high 90's without the high humidity factor for 3 months straight now and the cheese cloth lets wind blow through, rain and provides enough shade that it will lower temps about 20 degrees and so the plants are still making flowers and fruits.

Cheap easy way is to get them aluminum fence posts. You can 8 ' long ones and put one or two feet in the ground. You get the little metal caps that go on the top where you slide a top bar in if you were doing a fence. You can place the material over each pole and put the little metal cap on it and it will hold the material even through tornado winds.

If you go around to markets where folks set up tents on days there a bad storm, alot of times you can get free tent frames and bring them home, unbend them and through cheese cloth over the top of them for a cheap 10 x 10 gh/shade house. Then when you done you can take down easily.

If you need more shade look for folks throwing out trampolines. Especially the part if they had the protection barrier. It makes a good shade cloth and the trampoline material is great for ground cover. Rain goes through but doesn't let any weeds come through.

I use both types. The cheese cloth and the trampoline cloth. The cheese cloth has tinier holes so it keeps loads more bugs out. I put on the top and will hang pieces on the side that gets the full afternoon sun. No fancy clamps needed. I just grab a corner, type some string around the corners and tie to my frame. If I'm covering gh, then I just use them 1.00 clamps. They strong, don't need alot of them and they hold up against high winds. Material doesn't slide off.
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Old July 28, 2016   #13
Gardeneer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cole_Robbie View Post
Tents have to keep out rain. Shade cloth doesn't. If you break it up into smaller pieces, the wind will blow through them, instead of tearing everything down.

I'm thinking of something like a streamer tape, wrapped over adjacent hoops. It doesn't have to be perfect to be effective.

I like the streamer tape / strip idea.
You don't need 100% coverage, as the sun angle keeps changing , different parts will get shade and sun accordingly. The advantage of it is that air will circulate better and it will stand the winds.
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Old July 28, 2016   #14
Salsacharley
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I bought a bunch of 70% shade cloth from the big box stores before I even looked elsewhere. I am covering an area 32' x 32". I also have another area 20' x 30". Mine came in 6' x 20' for the most part. I've spent about $500 on all of it over 2 years. Mine is the green. I can tell you that where I am, at 6000' altitude and 100 - 105 degrees for weeks on end, the cloth promotes blossoms (prevents blossom drop) and cools the tomato patch at least 10 degrees. My altitude is supposed to intensify radiation and I believe it. I have plants at the edge of the shade cloth that get sun scald and all the plants completely inside the shade don't. I feel the intense radiation as soon as I step outside the shade cloth. I have a "superstructure I built with 2x3's and 1/2" metal conduit. I use hose clamps to secure the conduit and drilled holes in the 2x3's. I use zip ties to hold the shade cloth in place. It's all fun. My structure has easily survived 50 mph winds this year, and I seen no damage. I must say I figured this out after having my whole structure blown down last year.

Here's a couple of pictures.
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Old July 29, 2016   #15
My Foot Smells
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Great replies and ideas for use. Salsa, nice setup to retard the new mex heat, as plants look healthy instead of crispy.

My garden area I established as a refuge for idle enjoyment and creative aesthetics as well as, mental respite from this crazy world and work. So don't want to make it look like a hooverville and willing to spare the expense once a year, or every other year with the ideal in mind that this is a 20 year plan that can be enjoyed into my retirement (ha!) years. Probably won't feel like doing much heavy lifting in my mid-70's (who knows?); so will take that task on now with longevity in mind.

The arches I was interested in have a 12 foot base, pole-pole, but only 7' in height. I have to go raised bed, so that will not be high enough. Now thinking about sinking some metal poles (12') in concrete and attaching cloth to top of poles. I don't want to tether poles (hate guide wires w/ mowing maintenance), so looking to drill 3' - maybe more and hope that is deep enough to give stability. No garden project shall be initiated w/o permission from the head groundskeeper!! Unfortunately, I am one in the same. Got to hate in when someone has a "grand" idea, but adds 1 hour of weedeatin' to the maintenance schedule.

Thanks for the wonderful replies and outstanding pictures of pudding proof that shade cloth does indeed help with intense heat.

In addition, think I am going to try the gutter thing will some peppers next year.

I have a "no build" policy from Memorial Day ----> Labor Day. Just too hot and hate calf cramps working in the high heat. Have a small deck project on the docket already and then this little detail.......
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