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Old June 1, 2017   #1
TexasTomat0
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Default San Marzano Redorta

Does anyone have experience growing this variety? I tried it and was expecting larger oval (San marzano shaped) tomatoes. Instead this is what they looked like.

I got the seeds from seeds from Italy. These oook nothing like what was on the packet or any I've seen pics of.





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Old June 1, 2017   #2
Father'sDaughter
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Definitely not San Marzano Redorta. I would guess a seed mix-up. The vendor has been pretty responsive to customers from what I've experienced, so I would give them a call.
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Old June 1, 2017   #3
Father'sDaughter
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Also, if you go back and look at Franchi's other offerings, which I'm assuming yours were Franchi seeds, you might be able to figure out what variety you do have. My personal guess would be Pantano Romanesco.

Does Franchi still pack their seeds inside the small packets that go in the larger seed pack? If you still have that, have you looked to see if the inner packet has any labeling on it?
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Old June 1, 2017   #4
cwavec
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Default SMR

Glad to see this thread but definitely not happy about it. I too am growing
San Marzano sel Redorta this year from Seeds From Italy. That definitely is
not what I would expect to see. It looks more like a Marmande type than
anything else.

With regard to the origin of this selection, I was surprised to find out a
few days ago that it has nothing at all to do with the San Marzano tomato
and is definitely not a "selection" of that variety. In fact it apparently does
not even grow in the same region. There are websites that point out this
fact but not in a very coherent way that I can see.

To summarize:

1) The San Marzano tomato is grown only in a specific area surrounding the
town of San Marzano Sul Sarno, to the southeast of Naples. It is a legally
protected origin and it is not permissible to refer to a tomato grown elsewhere
as "San Marzano".

2) On the other hand, an apparent exception is the tomato known as
San Marzano Redorta or San Marzano sel Redorta. This is grown in an
area of Lombardy, much further north (near Milan) and reputedly within
view of the mountain known as Pizzo Redorta.

3) For some reason, San Marzano Redorta has gained a reputation (at
least in the US) of being preferable - bigger, tastier, who knows?? Seeds
From Italy do not disclose or discuss these differences in their publicity,
as far as I know. I am not going back right now to search their ads or
catalog, so this point may be disputed. They do say it is named after the
mountain and that it should produce "very large (9-12 ounce) tomatoes
on large plants.

The two SMR plants in my garden have foliage similar to a couple of
oxhearts I have grown before, so that's a good sign.

I've added two attachments - of the front and back of the Franchi
packet from which I took my seeds. The photos are clearly of a plum type.

Incidentally, though my Italian is rudimentary at best, the designation
"S. MARZANO SEL. "REDORTA"" implies to me a claim that this is
actually a "San Marzano" tomato or a "selection" of that, in other
words a protected variety misrepresented. I wonder how they get away
with that? Unless it's true? Only there's no indication that it's grown
in the protected area? Unless it is? Then how do you get simultaneous
views of Pizzo Redorta and Vesuvius at the same time when they are
about 500 miles apart.

P.S. - I do see now that Seeds From Italy offers a "San Marzano 2" seed
distinct from the Sel. Redorta. They don't seem to have much to say
about the origin of either one. Without further information one would not
be remiss in concluding that Sel. Redorta is simply a "better" San Marzano.
That's what I thought until I started looking into these things. Yes, I
wonder how they get away with that.

Anyone want to clarify or set me straight ????
Attached Images
File Type: jpg SMR frontc.jpg (287.9 KB, 148 views)
File Type: jpg SMR backc.jpg (296.7 KB, 148 views)
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Old June 1, 2017   #5
cwavec
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Default SMR same as "San Marzano"?

Incidentally, they do claim that this is a San Marzano tomato.

Quote from Seeds From Italy catalog 2017:

"Named for a mountain in the Alps near Bergamo. This strain of
San Marzano is considerably larger than San Marzano 2."

Hmmmm. Wonder how they get away with that?
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Old June 1, 2017   #6
nancyruhl
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I have grown this variety many times and it is one of my favorite paste tomatoes. It resembles the Franchi picture. I have grown it so long I do not remember the original source. Well worth the effort to get the right variety.
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Old June 1, 2017   #7
friedgreen51
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Default San Marzano Redorta

Hi,
I grew San Marzano Redorta last year. It is definitely a different shape from your tomato as pictured. It is the classic paste shape, larger than regular San Marzano. I think the seed you have were a mix-up.
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Old June 1, 2017   #8
HudsonValley
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I'm growing San Marzano Redorta for the first time this year (from MMMM seeds). Mine just went in the ground last week, so I have no idea about fruit shape yet, but the plant has somewhat droopy, smallish leaves that remind me of Amish Paste. I read somewhere on these boards that wispy leaves are typical of this variety. Assuming that info is correct, leaf type might help avoid future mix-ups before planting out...
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Old June 1, 2017   #9
Father'sDaughter
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I don't have their catalog, but here's the description from their website where it's called a San Marzano type --

"San Marzano Redorta. Franchi Special Selection. Named for a mountain in the Alps, this is a very large (10-12 ounce) San Marzano type plum tomato. Indeterminate. Large, vigorous plant. This has real tomato flavor and is good to eat fresh, make sauce, can or dry. Approx. 150 seeds. 80 days."

http://www.growitalian.com/tomato-sa...edorta-106-94/

I see Tomato Fest had a similar description but calls it a "cousin" of San Marzano.

As for the "sel" -- Franchi uses this language to identify their "special selection" varieties -- it has nothing to do with it being a "selection" of a particular variety. It's attached to everything from tomatoes to lettuce. My guess it's probably along the lines of our "All America Selection" varieties.

I've grown many of the "San Marzano" types over the years with limited success. My parents have also grown many, with much success. But we agree that the "real" San Marzano is not worth growing.

I've had huge success with San Marzano Nano, which probably has no relation to the original San Marzano, but someone attached the name to it along the way and it stuck. My Parents' go-to is San Marzano Lungo (which is probably closely related to San Marzano 2). And the only one that seems to be marginally happy in my garden is a San Marzano Redorta grown from seeds my husband was given by an older Italian man who originally brought them back from Italy years ago. Given that Franchi is one of the larger seed producers in Italy, for all I know he brought back Franchi seeds...

It's been my experience that the folks who own Seeds of Italy have always provided good customer service, so if you have an issue call them and let them know. If the issue is with the seeds themselves or the packaging, then perhaps they can provide a contact person at Franchi.
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Old April 8, 2018   #10
Ruralmailman
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They look more like Seeds of Italy Red Pears. I grow both every year. I do have trouble with the Redorta seedlings. They will look droopy until they get in the ground and then they will just take off.
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Old April 8, 2018   #11
MuddyToes
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Default Me too

Quote:
Originally Posted by HudsonValley View Post
I'm growing San Marzano Redorta for the first time this year (from MMMM seeds). Mine just went in the ground last week, so I have no idea about fruit shape yet, but the plant has somewhat droopy, smallish leaves that remind me of Amish Paste. I read somewhere on these boards that wispy leaves are typical of this variety. Assuming that info is correct, leaf type might help avoid future mix-ups before planting out...
Got mine from MMMM, too. I will try to remember to take a picture when I get fruit. I was expecting a plum type. I grew regular San Marzano 2 years ago. I can’t remember if I started from seed or not. But, it was incredibly prolific. It wasn’t very tall, but very bushy and I kept having to put more supports around it every time it rained. Sauce was very good.
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