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Old May 9, 2021   #1
JCessna
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Default Seminole Pumpkin Squash

Does anyone else grow Seminole Pumpkin? They taste like butternut, but are much more prolific. When picked completely ripe they can last a full year. They do take up a lot of space, but they climb well, so trellising isn't a problem. They are also very resistant to squash vine borers.
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Old May 14, 2021   #2
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Hadn't heard of them. But if they're actually resistant to SVB's, then I'm very interested to hear more!
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Old May 14, 2021   #3
GoDawgs
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I knew I had grown it one time before but wow, I had to go back into my records a bit to find out when. It was in 2015. I remember the vine borers did not attack but it only put out two small pumpkins and you're right about it being rampant. It merrily went scampering off to go play in the asparagus area but that was OK as they were just making ferns at the time.

I dropped it due to the space needed. That asparagus area no longer exists so maybe I could try it one more time.
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Old May 15, 2021   #4
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My curiosity got the best of me... I ordered some seeds late yesterday from SESE.
I plan on a single plant in a 45 gal Kratky barrel as an experiment.
Got to keep it interesting!
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Old May 15, 2021   #5
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The seed is variable depending on who you buy it from. Baker Creek has been the best for me. I also recommend a trap crop of Maxima (Jarrahdale pumpkin and buttercup worked well) to pull the SVB away. In north Texas I put away over 40 squash at the end of the year with three hills planted. I expect to do better here in the Austin area.
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Old 3 Weeks Ago   #6
mike5953
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Thought I would follow up on my experience growing this unusual squash...
I should point out that there are at least two varieties of Seminole Pumpkin being marketed. The variety that was said to be the more desirable of the two was not available at SESE at the time. The one I grew was said to be more sprawling and less prolific. Both of which turned out to be true.
One of the vines grew to almost 40 feet, and rooted itself in several places along the way. As big as it was, it only put out maybe a dozen pumpkins.
I tried grilling one while it was still green to see if it was summer squash-like. To my taste buds, it most definitely did not. It was too bland and starchy tasting.
But, when grown until it is fully ripe, it turns in to a nice winter squash that tastes excellent. I took a snapshot of one at last night's dinner.
Oh, and the plant did not succumb to SVB's or disease. It stayed healthy all summer.



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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #7
NewWestGardener
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A dozen of pumpkins is not bad.
So how do we know which one of the two to order?
I'm going to check out Rareseeds to see if they have a good one.
Thanks for sharing.


Quote:
Originally Posted by mike5953 View Post
Thought I would follow up on my experience growing this unusual squash...
I should point out that there are at least two varieties of Seminole Pumpkin being marketed. The variety that was said to be the more desirable of the two was not available at SESE at the time. The one I grew was said to be more sprawling and less prolific. Both of which turned out to be true.
One of the vines grew to almost 40 feet, and rooted itself in several places along the way. As big as it was, it only put out maybe a dozen pumpkins.
I tried grilling one while it was still green to see if it was summer squash-like. To my taste buds, it most definitely did not. It was too bland and starchy tasting.
But, when grown until it is fully ripe, it turns in to a nice winter squash that tastes excellent. I took a snapshot of one at last night's dinner.
Oh, and the plant did not succumb to SVB's or disease. It stayed healthy all summer.



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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #8
mike5953
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
A dozen of pumpkins is not bad.
So how do we know which one of the two to order?
I'm going to check out Rareseeds to see if they have a good one.
Thanks for sharing.

I saw some at Rareseeds last year, so maybe they will have them.
At SESE, I believe that this is the better of the two (I'm trying it next year): https://www.southernexposure.com/pro...inole-pumpkin/
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #9
NewWestGardener
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Thanks for the link, I’ll keep my eyes out for December when they’ll have seeds.
They mentioned that they are good as a summer squash as well. I love those dual purpose squash. I just found out this year that the spaghetti squash is really good as a summer squash, better than the ripe ones as winter squash, another dual purpose squash.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike5953 View Post
I saw some at Rareseeds last year, so maybe they will have them.
At SESE, I believe that this is the better of the two (I'm trying it next year): https://www.southernexposure.com/pro...inole-pumpkin/
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #10
mike5953
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewWestGardener View Post
I just found out this year that the spaghetti squash is really good as a summer squash, better than the ripe ones as winter squash, another dual purpose squash.

Interesting!
I've never heard that about spaghetti squash, and honestly can't imagine how it might taste before it's fully ripe.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #11
NewWestGardener
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Comparable to zucchini, with more and better texture.

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Originally Posted by mike5953 View Post
Interesting!
I've never heard that about spaghetti squash, and honestly can't imagine how it might taste before it's fully ripe.
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Old 2 Weeks Ago   #12
Tormato
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Kama Kamo (Kumi Kumi) is also known as a dual purpose summer or winter squash.

I prefer strictly summer squashes (like Rugosa Friulana for a yellow one), and strictly winter squashes (like Tetsukabuto F1), for the best flavor. I've never found a dual purpose squash that tasted great as both a summer and winter squash.
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