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General information and discussion about cultivating melons, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins and gourds.

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Old July 12, 2019   #31
Tormato
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Thank you, Whwoz. I usually grow bush squash, or winter squash not quite as sprawling. I too get a useless rush of late setting fruit on melons in the summer heat, but sadly squash bugs generally take care of that situation for me. I once saw a video, peas perhaps, if the tendril didn't find something to attach to it would wither and die, and not grow the vine properly. I am all set to go but the heat may limit what I can get done this weekend.


- Lisa



Squash vines are somewhat delicate. If the current growth is not a problem, but later growth will be, you can train the new growth to where you want it to grow.



Move the tips of the vines to the direction you want them growing, and put a stick in the ground next to the vine to keep them growing in that direction. Keep moving the stick as the vine grows.
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Old July 12, 2019   #32
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It got too late in the season and I ran out of room for planting vining squash. So, I'm taking a shot at trialing F2 seed of Astia (a hybrid zucchini). I'd be hoping for something compact and early, but at this point I'm really hoping for anything.
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Old July 12, 2019   #33
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here is what i have growing
yellow crook neck from saved seeds. this one gets warty when big. we'll see if it is true to type.
gray hubbard. i grew this one a couple years ago. huge plant.
blue kuri
thelma sanders sweet potato
a small round winter squash i got from a guy here that runs a csa. i forget the name of it. he got his seeds from baker creek. supposed to be prolific. flesh is yellow dry, and sweet. good flavor. they are a single serve size.
canada long neck. looks like a butter nut only has a really long neck. might be an ancestor of butternut.
scar chucks supreme
golden scallop
ingot
golden zucchini.
fordhook zucchini
black beauty zucchini
my striato d italia died shortly after transplanting so was related by the last two zucchini.



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Old July 13, 2019   #34
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This year I grew:

Early Prolific Straightneck
Green Vegetable Marrow (old timey zuke type)
Patty Pan Blend (just grew one plant so don't know what all kinds were in the pack)
Small Wonder spaghetti squash (smaller than the standard sized fruits)
Butterbush (winter type)
Sweet Mama (winter kabocha type)
Small Sugar pumpkin

I'm thinking about not doing any of the winter types next year except the spaghetti squash, as they take up a lot of room for the few squashes they produce. The spaghetti squash is the exception as it's very prolific for me. Might keep the pumpkin too. I think it's just too hot here for the others.

Pulled all of the spaghettis, pumpkins and butterbushes this past week:

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Old July 13, 2019   #35
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I put out regular old waltham's butternut when I pulled the peas. I ran okra starts on one side of the double row and butternut starts on the other. I'm going to try to train these out in an orderly fashion, this year. Think I'll use sod staples to lock down the main vines at right angle to the row. Yep, that's the plan. I'm sure they'll stay civilized in their growth.

I like eating butternut around February when it starts to take on that beautiful nutty flavor.
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Old July 14, 2019   #36
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Trying to reduce the size of the garden, so I was going to eliminate zucchini this year...at the last minute I bought Dark Star in the store- which is an example of why I've made so little progress simplifying and shrinking the garden. It's survived what I thought was a deadly borer attack in late June and is producing a nice number of fruits. Kind of a viney type and tends to produce fruits that grow into the ground, so if I decide to grow zucchini again next season, I'll go back to Raven or Midnight Lightning because I really don't want to try to grow zucchini vertically. As soon as the squash bugs arrive and get out of control, it'll be pulled assuming it's still alive then.

Also in the name of space saving, I'm trialing butternut squash varieties to determine which one, if any, is reasonably easy to trellis: Burpee Butterbush from Fedco, Burpee Butterbush from Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, JWS 6823 and Metro F1. No clear winner so far.
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Old July 14, 2019   #37
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I am growing Black Beauty, Zephyr-a hybrid which is half green and half yellow from Fedco, Costata Romanesco, Alexandria Lebanese squash, yellow crookneck and finally Rugosa Friulana from seeds graciously sent to me from JtjMartin. Really looking forward to trying those. Lots of vines everywhere! We love summer squash and a gratin is so pretty with so many colors.
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Old July 15, 2019   #38
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kath, when was last minute to you? Apparently, I am terrible at growing zucchini. I think that first year with butternut here brought in so many squash bugs to the yard that our summer squash gets destroyed as soon as it starts producing. This year I didn't plant any back there...but now a few went in pots out front.
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Old July 15, 2019   #39
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Here’s my short list. Finally got some trellising up and a new place ready for squash. Deciding between these this week,I know it’s late but I may be able to get in just under the wire ,especially if we have a late first frost:
Testukbuto ( needs a maxima or moschata pollinator)
Kabocha
Cushaw or Seminole ( which is sweeter and/or shorter season?)
Trombocino
Butta
Romanesco zuchinni or maybe a hybrid bush zucchini
Maybe will also do Speckled Hound squash.
Might swap out trombocino for something else, not sure what. Maybe spaghetti squash or Georgia Candy Roaster. Or, just grow both cushaw and Seminole.
I haven’t had any success with squash in North Carolina but haven’t tried the c.mixta,c.moschatas or hybrid species yet. I sort of quit trying after a couple of total failures when we first moved here. I did pretty well with squash in Arizona which makes it even harder to accept the failures here,especially since other things grow so easily here,if I get past all the bugs.

Last edited by Tracydr; July 15, 2019 at 05:58 AM.
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Old July 15, 2019   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Tetsukabuto (F1) Hubbard Squash

Tormato gave notice in the MMMM this variety is a very large plant. Indeed it is. It has left the squash bed, growing through the tomatoes,expanding into the lawn, and is now covering the porcelain garlic. I need to harvest this garlic now, before the squash is mature.

How can I move several vines growing in one direction, some with small (about a golf ball) fruit? It is growing on black plastic but attaching to the garlic and all sorts of random weeds breaking thru the fabric. Last resort is to prune, but would that kill the entire plant?

- Lisa
What are you using for a pollinator? This squash needs a pollinator.
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Old July 15, 2019   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha View Post
Tetsukabuto (F1) Hubbard Squash

Tormato gave notice in the MMMM this variety is a very large plant. Indeed it is. It has left the squash bed, growing through the tomatoes,expanding into the lawn, and is now covering the porcelain garlic. I need to harvest this garlic now, before the squash is mature.

How can I move several vines growing in one direction, some with small (about a golf ball) fruit? It is growing on black plastic but attaching to the garlic and all sorts of random weeds breaking thru the fabric. Last resort is to prune, but would that kill the entire plant?

- Lisa


Back to this post. I forgot to mention one VERY important thing about vining squash. They can send down roots at the leaf nodes (if the vine is touching the ground at those nodes). So, moving vines might be almost impossible at times.
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Old July 15, 2019   #42
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Originally Posted by rxkeith View Post
here is what i have growing
yellow crook neck from saved seeds. this one gets warty when big. we'll see if it is true to type.
gray hubbard. i grew this one a couple years ago. huge plant.
blue kuri
thelma sanders sweet potato
a small round winter squash i got from a guy here that runs a csa. i forget the name of it. he got his seeds from baker creek. supposed to be prolific. flesh is yellow dry, and sweet. good flavor. they are a single serve size.
canada long neck. looks like a butter nut only has a really long neck. might be an ancestor of butternut.
scar chucks supreme
golden scallop
ingot
golden zucchini.
fordhook zucchini
black beauty zucchini
my striato d italia died shortly after transplanting so was related by the last two zucchini.



keith


Kieth,



I'd like to hear and end of season report on the Scarchucks Supreme.
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Old July 15, 2019   #43
Tracydr
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What are you using for a pollinator? This squash needs a pollinator.
Kabocha squash for sure which is c.maxima.
Possibly the speckled hound and/or the candy roaster which are also c.maxima.
I think trombocino is a moschata and I may have some sort of butternut squash seeds hanging around here somewhere which could be an option. I’ll plant out some evening this week. Having a miserable heat wave this whole week so I guess I’m going to have to brave the weather and get out there if I want to get anything planted.

Last edited by Tracydr; July 15, 2019 at 06:36 PM.
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Old July 15, 2019   #44
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Can somebody compare cushaw and Seminole squash?
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Old July 15, 2019   #45
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I decided to not plant any squash this year because I am tired of fighting the squash bugs. In addition to my regular garden, I also have a fifty foot flower bed, five feet wide; which has been an asparagus bed for three years. The bed is three railroad ties deep with buried soaker hose. It also has a lot of desert succulents planted in it. This year I decided to make the bed more attractive by planting tomatoes, okra, peppers, and a few other edible vegetables in the bed which grow and fruit at different levels. As an after thought I planted some yellow summer squash and Butternut squash seeds thinking I would be lucky if the seeds even germinate so late in the season. The bed is gorgeous and productive from when the asparagus first breaks through the ground until the first frost each year. The squash is growing great but hasn't produced anything yet. I'm hoping the early squash bug season is over.


I'm thinking of planting watermelon in the bed next year for a plant which will spread, but remain at ground level.

Last edited by DonDuck; July 15, 2019 at 08:15 PM.
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