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Old September 1, 2019   #1
Tracydr
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Default Mediterranean garden

Working on a new section to my garden. Will have figs,artichokes,lavender,thyme,rosemary,potted citrus, pomegranate and grapes. I’m adding plenty of lime, it’s in a full sun spot, sandy soil and I plan to use crushed oyster shell for mulch.
Any other ideas?
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Old September 1, 2019   #2
bower
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Sounds lovely! Don't forget garden sage - even if we don't eat it often, the flowers are lovely and the leaves make the best ever bandage for cuts or splinters.
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Old September 1, 2019   #3
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Muscadines, way less troublesome than grapes and native to the US.
Makes the most unbelievable wine.
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Old September 1, 2019   #4
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Sounds lovely, Tracy and will be a nice spot to sit for a minute and enjoy it, too.
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Old September 1, 2019   #5
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If you could plant some almonds and olives, you'd pretty much have it sewn up.
The almond trees bloom in February on the Mediterranean. Their flowers are the first thing to appear as sign of spring. Just gorgeous to see fields of these from a train window, even better to have a few in your own garden. You need two to pollinate.
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Old September 1, 2019   #6
rxkeith
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well golly gee willikers,

i have a good start to a mediterranean garden too now that i think of it.

i have a fig tree growing, three years old now in a pot that goes in the basement during our not so mediterranean winter. i also have a rosemary shrub that goes upstairs where it is cool during the winter. i have thyme growing in pots, and some greek oregano too.
i think i'll bring some thyme, and oregano in for the winter for fresh herbs.
hey, i have italian flat leaf parsley in a pot that can come indoors. thats a hat trick.

may you have many happy relaxing hours in your garden tracy.



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Old September 1, 2019   #7
Shrinkrap
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracydr View Post
Working on a new section to my garden. Will have figs,artichokes,lavender,thyme,rosemary,potted citrus, pomegranate and grapes. I’m adding plenty of lime, it’s in a full sun spot, sandy soil and I plan to use crushed oyster shell for mulch.
Any other ideas?
Sounds familiar! Olives? Oops! That answer is already taken.

Last edited by Shrinkrap; September 1, 2019 at 11:38 PM.
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Old September 2, 2019   #8
GoDawgs
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I hear Georgia's ag folks are playing with more cold tolerant olives down near the Florida border so I was excited to hear that. Unfortunately, right now that's about as far north as olives will survive unless they're potted and inside the house during the winter.
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Old September 2, 2019   #9
Worth1
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Something was eating at me about what to plant.
Just remembered.
A bay tree, they are evergreen and you can collect a leaf anytime of the year.
Fresh and dried have two different flavors too.
Nothing says Mediterranean like a bay tree.
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Old September 4, 2019   #10
Cole_Robbie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Muscadines, way less troublesome than grapes and native to the US.
Makes the most unbelievable wine.

I had to look up what those were. They look great. I am one zone north of their hardiness rating, but maybe it would still be possible to grow them, given enough care.
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Old September 4, 2019   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Worth1 View Post
Muscadines, way less troublesome than grapes and native to the US.
Makes the most unbelievable wine.



Some friends of miine own the largest muscadine vineyard in Texas. It makes great wine. They originally planned on packaging and selling the grapes in retail outlets. Customers are not accustomed to eating muscadine's with the tough skin so they didn't sell well. They started packing the grapes and shipping them to a winery which then shipped the finished wine back to them. Transportation costs were high, so they are currently installing all the large, stainless vats to make their own wine. Their wine market has grown very well in the past few years so they doubled the size of the vineyard last year.

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Old September 4, 2019   #12
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Some almond trees are hardy to zone 6 and self-fertile. But the deer love them.
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Old September 7, 2019   #13
Shrinkrap
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Can you do a lemon? Meyers tolerates a bit more chill. One thing to keep in mind ks lots of Mediterranean plants will only to,erase wet soil in the "winter" if at all, a d are t built for much humidity.

Sages (there are so many!), lavenders, probably already been said. Ornamental oregano.

My sister lives in Durham. Have a safe hurricane season!

Last edited by Shrinkrap; September 7, 2019 at 02:18 AM.
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Old September 20, 2019   #14
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I'm just preparing the soil for a similar garden here in Melbourne Australia. My soil is more clay than the typical Mediterranean garden, but this area is very dry thanks to a fence and nearby gum tree so I think it will work.



I'm planning on loosley espaliering a row of olives against the fence, and underplanting with rosemary, thyme, sage, oregano and lavender. There are already a few artichokes in the bed, and I have potted fig and bay that I may move into this area. I won't plant out the fig - I find their roots difficult to manage once they get going.



Sadly Citrus don't grow well in my mountain valley area as we get severe frosts.


I would love to see photos of your garden when it is planted!
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Old September 20, 2019   #15
Worth1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CassInVic View Post
I'm just preparing the soil for a similar garden here in Melbourne Australia. My soil is more clay than the typical Mediterranean garden, but this area is very dry thanks to a fence and nearby gum tree so I think it will work.



I'm planning on loosley espaliering a row of olives against the fence, and underplanting with rosemary, thyme, sage, oregano and lavender. There are already a few artichokes in the bed, and I have potted fig and bay that I may move into this area. I won't plant out the fig - I find their roots difficult to manage once they get going.



Sadly Citrus don't grow well in my mountain valley area as we get severe frosts.


I would love to see photos of your garden when it is planted!
I hope you read this and out of subject but can you use red gum for wooden cooking spoons?
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