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Old 1 Week Ago   #1
Gardenboy
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Default Amish Paste tomato

Can you tell me if this tomato is a beefsteak slicer or actually a paste tomato? Pictures I've seen the tomato looks big for a paste tomato. How is the taste and production? Will be starting my 2024 FL tomato seedlings end of August, weather permitting. Did anyone have any disease problem with this variety. Wanted something new to try this season. Thanks for the information.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #2
MrBig46
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I grew Amish paste in the 2022 season. I think it's a really fleshy paste type tomato, even if the flesh is not as dry as, for example, Opalka, San Marzano, etc. On the other hand, it surpasses other tomatoes in terms of taste when fresh. As for the harvest, it was big for me.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #3
eyolf
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I have grown it twice and second the above.

Not a bad tomato in any way, but I wouldn't label it a high-solids (and moderate flavor) paste tomato.

For us, it was an interesting novelty and worth growing for that.

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Old 1 Week Ago   #4
VirginiaClay
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They're definitely not dry, paste-type tomatoes like Roma or San Marzano, and yes, they're bigger than most paste tomatoes. The flesh has the juicy consistency of a normal slicing tomato, but it has somewhat less gel and seeds, so it's better for cooking than most slicing tomatoes.

I found it to be way more flavorful than all the paste tomatoes I've ever grown; I liked the flavor and texture for both fresh eating and cooking.

I've only grown it once, last year. The plant was large and vigorous and produced well. It seemed to have average foliage disease resistance -- it lost a lot of leaves to early blight, but that's true for most of the tomato plants here each summer. It stopped producing a little earlier than some of the other plants in my garden, but I think that may have been due to the fact that there turned out to be root-knot nematodes in the soil where it was planted.

I plan to grow it again.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #5
Jimbotomateo
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Sounds delicious. Might try next season. This season I’m growing German Johnson, Hot streak and sun gold. Btw hi again friends.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #6
JRinPA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gardenboy View Post
Can you tell me if this tomato is a beefsteak slicer or actually a paste tomato? Pictures I've seen the tomato looks big for a paste tomato. How is the taste and production? Will be starting my 2024 FL tomato seedlings end of August, weather permitting. Did anyone have any disease problem with this variety. Wanted something new to try this season. Thanks for the information.

I agree with the above that it is sort of neither a slicer or a paste, a bit unique. I grew it last year for the first time and have two more cages this year.

Last year it stayed healthy enough and produced well...I always get disease, here. Two plants threw the large oval shaped tomatoes like MrBig's pics. One plant consistently threw a smaller tomato with a neck...see pics. I kept seed from the large ovals. I gave most of them away for sauce making - I didn't need to make sauce last year. But this year they are in the lineup for that purpose.

They are edible as a sandwich tomato. Not the best, but much better than a paste tomato. My thoughts last year were: "Taste on the big meaty amish paste is surprisingly solid. Not super fruity like a good slicer, but eatable raw. The little things, they taste like little plum usually taste like to me, nothing."

The two in the middle of the row are amish paste cages. They are shorter and really fill out the volume with thick, twisty vines. There are three plants in each cage. I'm trying to limit those three roots to 10 total stems up each cage.

The cage in front of them is a good foot taller and contains Mountaineer Delight. All the other tomato plants are taller than the Amish Paste plants.

I think it is called the internode length? It seems to be very short internode length with this tomato.

Pic of tomatoes is from last year, left is amish paste, right is...amish paste? I kept seeds from the left! Plants were grown from the same pack of store bought seeds. They were quite a bit different tomatoes.
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Old 1 Week Ago   #7
VirginiaClay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRinPA View Post

The two in the middle of the row are amish paste cages. They are shorter and really fill out the volume with thick, twisty vines. There are three plants in each cage. I'm trying to limit those three roots to 10 total stems up each cage.

The cage in front of them is a good foot taller and contains Mountaineer Delight. All the other tomato plants are taller than the Amish Paste plants.

I think it is called the internode length? It seems to be very short internode length with this tomato.
Interesting. My plant last year (the only time I've grown it) was a tall, sprawling thing, not bushy at all. It made it up to the top of a 6' stake (6' above ground, I mean) and back down to the ground. I like the look of your plants much better!
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Old 1 Week Ago   #8
Gardenboy
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Nice pictures. What are the 3 large brownish black tomatoes you have on your tailgate?
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Old 1 Week Ago   #9
JRinPA
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Black from Tula, those were. I was impressed enough with them to grow again this year as my only dark tomato. I like the idea of growing one variety each for red, yellow/orange, pink, and black so I can easily keep them straight on the counter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by my thoughts from last year
Three black from Tula, two Amish paste from two plants and two Amish paste from another plant that look much different. Taste on the big meaty amish paste is surprisingly solid. Not super fruity like a good slicer, but eatable raw. The little things, they taste like little plum usually taste like to me, nothing.

I'll save seeds from the big ones, thank you very much.

The Black from Tula, the leftmost one, very good overall, tastier than the big AP. Certainly I like these black from tula more than I've liked, in previous years, black krim or paul robeson.



Here is another Amish Paste description of that green tipped one
Quote:
Originally Posted by my thoughts after eating that green nosed Amish Paste above
Amish Paste, on par for this variety, so far. Sweetness about medium, very solid but not oversweet. Flavor is just sort of neutral tomato, not really much bite. Sort of a softness to the meat. Not really mealiness, but no snap. Like it is ground burger snack sticks instead of whole meat jerky. I think a lot of people would like this just fine on sandwiches or salads.

In the pics of the cut tomatoes, the tomato on the left is small Cuostralee.



And the black from tula are looking good so far, grown on A-trellis at the comm garden. Just checked them yesterday. The two plants to the right of the orange connector are the Black From Tula. They get one foot of space and two stems each. Gotta earn that space in my gardens!
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Last edited by JRinPA; 1 Week Ago at 05:13 PM. Reason: add amish paste pics
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Old 1 Week Ago   #10
Tormato
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I consider it as a blocky heart-shaped tomato, the shape and size being extremely variable as compared to most varieties.
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