Tomatoville® Gardening Forums


Notices

General information and discussion about cultivating all other edible garden plants.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old September 25, 2019   #1
MuddyBuckets
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyBuckets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern USA 7b
Posts: 147
Default Tree Collards

Does anyone have experience growing tree collards? Looks like an interesting garden addition and healthy way to have collards all year. Advice and comments appreciated.
MuddyBuckets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 25, 2019   #2
Worth1
Tomatovillian™
 
Worth1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Den of Drunken Fools
Posts: 38,547
Default

Never heard of them, I hope someone has grown them.
Worth1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 25, 2019   #3
MuddyBuckets
Tomatovillian™
 
MuddyBuckets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Southern USA 7b
Posts: 147
Default

Tree Collard Cuttings offered on Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Tree-Collard-.../dp/B01CPQVU3W
MuddyBuckets is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26, 2019   #4
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 2,296
Default

I'm growing them. I bought seeds this year. Still alive but only about 10inch plants
though I did start late and may try and overwinter.

My original post...http://www.tomatoville.com/showthrea...ight=tree+kale

The walking stick cabbage, also known as tree kale, has been cultivated on the Isle of Jersey for centuries. This startling plant's thick stems can reach 7 feet in one growing season and up to 10 feet the second growing season, are turned into walking sticks for tourists. They have even been grown into sturdy roofbeams for thatched island cottages, plus providing fine edible greens the whole time. Proper name: Brassica oleracea longata 'Walking Stick'
oakley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26, 2019   #5
ScottinAtlanta
Tomatovillian™
 
ScottinAtlanta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Atlanta, Georgia
Posts: 2,443
Default

Very cool. I think I will try them.
ScottinAtlanta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old September 26, 2019   #6
oakley
Tomatovillian™
 
oakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: NewYork 5a
Posts: 2,296
Default

Your warmer winters are more promising than mine.
And I had no idea a kale/cabbage
would successfully grow from cuttings. who knew.
oakley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 28, 2020   #7
Jeannine Anne
Tomatovillian™
 
Jeannine Anne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,516
Default

I have grown Walking Stick Kale, just as a curiousity and it did grow very very tall. I had it on a community garden some years ago and left it there.It looked like a plam tree
Jeannine Anne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29, 2020   #8
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Augusta area, Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 1,365
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeannine Anne View Post
I have grown Walking Stick Kale, just as a curiousity and it did grow very very tall. I had it on a community garden some years ago and left it there.It looked like a plam tree
How was the flavor? And were the leaves about the same texture as regular kale or more tough?
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 29, 2020   #9
Jeannine Anne
Tomatovillian™
 
Jeannine Anne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,516
Default

I am sorry but I didn't eat it, apart from a raw bit when if first greened up and I thought it was a tad strong compared to the others I grew,it was more like a Scottish kale.It was grown just as a curiosity really and as a friend gave me the seeds of course I had to grow one', the other little plnts I shared with others and thete were two or three still growing when I left.

It was interesting though and my rabbits loved the greens.It was about 7 feet when I last saw it.First year planted it,then it lost a lot of leaves in the winter, but the second year it regrew very well, the second winter it lost leaves again and I expected that was it but it had started to come back when I left there in April.

It seemed a very tough plant.

Not much info, the diameter of the trunk was about the same as a kwi fruit.
Jeannine Anne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 30, 2020   #10
GoDawgs
Tomatovillian™
 
GoDawgs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Augusta area, Georgia, 8a/7b
Posts: 1,365
Default

Thnanks for the info. Boy, that's one tough plant to survive Canadian winters and keep on truckin'!
GoDawgs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 30, 2020   #11
Jeannine Anne
Tomatovillian™
 
Jeannine Anne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Canada
Posts: 1,516
Default

GoDawgs, sorry, I didn't say but I was back in the in the East of England for 9 years and I grew it then, which I might add is actually tougher than the Pacific North West where I am now. So I know it would grow here in Coastal BC,just 20 minutes from the Washington border. So I think weather wise you will be fine.
Jeannine Anne is offline   Reply With Quote
Old March 31, 2020   #12
habitat_gardener
Tomatovillian™
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: California Central Valley
Posts: 2,459
Default

I love tree collards! Have grown them at least a decade. In the SF Bay Area, they survived 20F at night for 2-3 days but were not happy. I think they are the best tasting kale, but are best cooked ( red Russian is my favorite raw kale). They need to be renewed every 3 years for best production, from cuttings, which are easy.

In central CA, they don’t seem as happy and I haven’t found the right place yet. Harlequin bugs and bagrada bugs love them too, unfortunately.
habitat_gardener is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
collards , interesting , tree

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:37 AM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★