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Old January 3, 2020   #1
GoDawgs
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Default Warm Weather, Confused Plants

Good grief! It's 79 out there this afternoon although a front is about to blow through in a little while. Then we'll be back to more normal upper 50's. No wonder some of the fall garden plants are confused.

An hour ago I had to cut the first three heads of the second set of broccoli plants because they were starting to loosen up in this spell of warm weather.
I also cut the first head of Late Flat Dutch cabbage (a new one for me) and pulled about ten scallions.



The cabbage was a bit disappointing. It measured 8"x7"x5" but it wasn't very heavy for its size, weighing only a hair over 2 lbs. The smaller Stoneheads are smaller but much more dense and heavier. This is why I trial different varieties. The 100 DTM Dutch is supposed to be a great kraut cabbage and it probably is in colder climates. I'll continue using the 55 DTM Stonehead for kraut and be stashing the remaining Dutch seeds in the freezer.

The Brussels sprouts are also not performing, as usual. This will absolutely be the last time trying to grow them here in this roller coaster winter weather. Some sprouts are trying to tighten but are having a hard time of it:



Others are loose as a goose and will never really head up. I think I'll cut the tops out of all the plants, see what happens and be done with them for good.

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Old January 3, 2020   #2
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Your own version of kalettes there. I ave never been lucky with brussel sprouts myself, so you have my empathy there. This winter is being so mild so far, and I am waiting for the other shoe to drop, so to speak. But, will be starting plants earlier this year because I suspect we will have an early summer here, too.
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Old January 4, 2020   #3
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Your own version of kalettes there. I ave never been lucky with brussel sprouts myself, so you have my empathy there. This winter is being so mild so far, and I am waiting for the other shoe to drop, so to speak. But, will be starting plants earlier this year because I suspect we will have an early summer here, too.
You're right! I oughtta just cut off those rosettes and cook 'em anyway!
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Old January 4, 2020   #4
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You seem to be stuck somewhere between Mistletoe and Snowdrop.
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Old January 4, 2020   #5
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You're right! I oughtta just cut off those rosettes and cook 'em anyway!

Try them, should work out well, still a brussels sprout!
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Old January 5, 2020   #6
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What is the name of the cabbage you like? Is it F1 Stonehead or ? Lots of different early stoneheads now, and many named similar.
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Old January 5, 2020   #7
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I believe it's the F1.

https://www.seedsnsuch.com/product/s...cabbage-seeds/

https://www.jungseed.com/product/J01590/1065
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Old January 5, 2020   #8
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Thanks, have you tried any of the new early varieties? My wife loves cabbage and I'd like to plant some in Feb. for her.
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Old January 5, 2020   #9
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Thanks, have you tried any of the new early varieties? My wife loves cabbage and I'd like to plant some in Feb. for her.
No, I haven't. To be honest I've gotten comfortable and satisfied with the success I've had with Stonehead and Charleston Wakefield so I haven't really paid attention to new early cabbages. Shame on me!

Could you post a few varietal names? I'll check them out.
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Old January 5, 2020   #10
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Mainly the early mini heads I see. I've never grown cabbage so I am shooting in the dark here, but Katarinia is a new hybrid that won a AAS award & is a 45 day baby cabbage. https://all-americaselections.org/pr...bage-katarina/
I'll probably try it because of quick turn around.
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Old January 5, 2020   #11
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Thanks for that. 4" heads are too small for what I want although they'd be nice for grabbing something fresh for dinner that night. I like the Stonehead because they really are hard and dense, great for kraut. Small core too. About 6"-7" heads

A friend of mine asked me, "Why the heck are you wasting your time growing cabbages when they're so cheap at the store?"

Well, first because I enjoy doing it.

Because I also like to be able to just cut some and make kraut, kimchi, steamed cabbage, cabbage casseroles, smothered cabbage, cabbage rolls, etc anytime I want (in season, of course, and even some time beyond that) without firing up the car and driving 7 miles to buy one!

Because with this size cabbage I can use it up in two days and not have half of a huge one lurking in the crisper awaiting use.

If you decide to try 'Katerina', please let me know how you liked it.
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Old January 7, 2020   #12
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For early cabbage, I like Earliana. Sweet and tender, 6" typical, been growing it every year since I discovered it a while back.
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Old January 8, 2020   #13
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There are a lot of small to medium early cabbages out there and it seems all of them I have tried have done well at one time or another. Some of them are almost too small for anything other than boiled cabbage for one or two small portion types. The advantage of those very early small cabbages is that they are some of the best tasting but they don't usually get very big and the seeds are usually pricey. Despite their drawbacks we like the taste of many and usually grow at least four or five varieties each year. I found one market cabbage called Golden Acre that makes a medium size tight head that is good for just about anything and the seeds are cheap. It holds well in the garden and is one of the more dependable and tasty varieties I have found. Just a good all round variety. If you want a tasty large headed variety you might want to try Capture it did really well the last two years but there is no way the wife and I can eat even half of one boiled so we always had a half in the fridge waiting to be eaten. It was ideal if you needed slaw for ten though.

I found a little trick that seemed to make my cabbage grow larger and faster last year. I sprinkled a good handful of ashes from my charcoal grill around each one then watered them well with my usual liquid fertilizer. I was amazed at how much larger than usual they were. Maybe it was a fluke so I guess I will have to try it again this year and see if it works as well again. I know one thing some of the usually very small early cabbages came out almost medium size which was a first.

Bill
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Old January 8, 2020   #14
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I found a little trick that seemed to make my cabbage grow larger and faster last year. I sprinkled a good handful of ashes from my charcoal grill around each one then watered them well with my usual liquid fertilizer. I was amazed at how much larger than usual they were.
Bill
Hmmm, I think I'll try that this spring. For sure I always have some grill ashes available. Thanks!
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