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Old July 9, 2021   #16
Altmer
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Hi, I have similar yellowing on my pink oxheart plants which is SLOWLY spreading to others. I have it every year at varying levels of severity. This year is particularly bad, which I'm certain is due to the wet, humid weather we're having in southern Ontario (last year it was excessive heat and flower drop, this year TONS of flowers/fruit but also tons of disease). In past years, I would touch my plants indiscriminately and move on to the next which would cause it to spread very fast. This year I'm not touching them, just pruning, and if I do I sanitize tools and hands before moving to the next plant. It makes a huge difference. So you might want to try this and in the meantime know there are others in solidarity with you
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Old July 9, 2021   #17
Milan HP
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Hello Altmer,
yes, that's what I have and I try to prevent further spreading in a similar way. My trouble is that I have the spores at home where I also grow my seedlings. No way to get rid of the source. I strongly believe it's Septoria. My seedlings were slightly infected prior to plant-out, but they just almost miraculously got rid of it in the garden and they look as fit as a fiddle (touch wood). My explanation is that the temps up there at 1800 ft are lower than where I live and it's windy there as well. And perhaps UVc light from the sun. On my balconies it's still spreading though. It's a race, but most my plants win in the end even though they look terrible with only one third (or even less) of their leaves. They keep giving me tomatoes, not as many as in the garden, but I am happy with that.
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Old July 12, 2021   #18
Altmer
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Hi Milan,

What kind of seedling soil/soilless mixture do you use for your seedlings? I'm wondering if whatever the fungas/bacteria is is spreading through compost or the seeds themselves? I'd like to avoid bringing it into where I plant my seedlings. For me, the plants look amazing and blemish free until I put them into my garden bed. I use only store bought seedling mix and I soak my clay pots in vinegar before germination.

Next year I'm going to experiment with grafting onto resistant roots. Should be fun to see how it works out!
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Old July 12, 2021   #19
zipcode
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The seeds and soil etc don't really matter. Not much anyway, it's mostly the conditions and also what your neighbors are doing. There is such a thing as disease pressure, if more spores of something are in the air the more the chances of infection.
Rules against septoria:
one stem prune and good spacing.
morning sun, this is not to be overlooked, it can make a huge difference
some leaf prune if the plants are still too bushy
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Old October 16, 2022   #20
paradajky
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Hi there, bumping up this old thread because I think I've figured out what's going on.



We tried planting a variety of non-tomatoes in this part of the garden in 2022, and nothing grew at all! Frustrating.



Going to run a soil analysis later, but suspicions are the soil is empty of any nitrogen, same as pre-season 2021.



This weekend I removed the stunted, dead plants, and as I worked my hands in the soil, there was a massive maze of roots. Heavy, strong, living network of roots.. I remember cutting through a bunch of roots when I first did the double-till thing in 2021, but didn't think much of it then.



Something's growing in and pulling the nutrients out, creating too much competition and the fruits/veggies can't grow. Could be the nearby trees.


Thoughts? Ideas how to overcome this?
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Old October 17, 2022   #21
Milan HP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paradajky View Post
Hi there, bumping up this old thread because I think I've figured out what's going on.



We tried planting a variety of non-tomatoes in this part of the garden in 2022, and nothing grew at all! Frustrating.



Going to run a soil analysis later, but suspicions are the soil is empty of any nitrogen, same as pre-season 2021.



This weekend I removed the stunted, dead plants, and as I worked my hands in the soil, there was a massive maze of roots. Heavy, strong, living network of roots.. I remember cutting through a bunch of roots when I first did the double-till thing in 2021, but didn't think much of it then.



Something's growing in and pulling the nutrients out, creating too much competition and the fruits/veggies can't grow. Could be the nearby trees.


Thoughts? Ideas how to overcome this?
Hello Paradajky,
what sort of trees are they? The worst case would be if they were wall nut trees. Juglans nigra, but Juglans regia wouldn't be good news either. Most probably they aren't. Wall nut trees produce juglone, which is sort of natural herbicide. It works in a different way from classic herbicide sprays though: it accumulates in the plant and kills it only after the poison levels reach a certain limit. And of course, any tree deprives the soil of nutrients and water.
There's a wall nut tree in my garden. It's Juglans regia and I'd like to keep it as my wife is a wall nut freak. The patch some 5 meters from the trunk is absolutely hopeless - nothing grows well there. And tomatoes at double the distance seem to be crippled in comparison to those in different locations.

My solution to the problem is a raised patch, impenetrably insulated from the ground (strong plastic foil?). I don't want to damage the wall nut tree's roots too much, but at the same time I don't want to give up growing veggies in that sunny position. I believe that could work even if the trees are of a different sort. It's my task for this winter.
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Old October 18, 2022   #22
paradajky
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Milan: nearby trees include various palm trees, fruit trees, a couple macadamia nut trees, italian cypruses, peppertrees, some cacti. I'm not sure of all the varieties. Each is 2-15 meters away. The nearest are the fruit trees (fig, plum, feijoa, apple). There are no other nut trees, and no walnut.

I don't know where these roots are coming from. There used to be a raspberry and blackberry bush there, but I don't really see any growing branches.
The two beds in this area are raised patches, but, they were done years ago and I doubt there was any sort of barrier put in place.
Well, I spread a bunch of clover seeds in hopes they will germinate as a winter ground cover, then dig them in february/march if they actually grow.


Also, the two beds are on little landing in the middle of a hill. The trees going up the hill are mostly dead due to lack of irrigation, but some of the hardier ones like the macadamia nut and pepper trees are doing well. The citrus and avocados are all dead.
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