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Old November 1, 2019   #1
shule1
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Default Thin-walled peppers

I'm looking to discover more peppers (hot and sweet) with thin walls (such that they dry quickly). I haven't found a terrible lot of them, actually, but I've grown a fair number of peppers. These are the ones with thin wqlls I've grown that come to mind:
* Aji Habanero (C. baccatum—not to be confused with Habaneros, which are C. chinense)
* Ring of Fire (Baker Creek's version)
* Orange Carbonero (not super thin, but they dry on the plant)

Ideally, they should be thin enough that they'll dry on the plant in a semi-arid area if you let them. Note that Ring of Fire doesn't seem to do this, but it dries quickly post-harvest.

Ideally, the peppers won't be huge (but they will be prolific). Huge peppers take longer to dry, in my experience. Ideally, they'll have lots of flavor.

Last edited by shule1; November 1, 2019 at 07:44 PM.
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Old November 2, 2019   #2
FarmerShawn
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Two that come to my mind are Guahillo and Pepperoncini. I have Bird chillies, Thai Hots, and Cayennes dry on the bush, and I'm in northern Vermont, not exactly a dry climate! Also Boldog Hungarian Paprika fits your description. And Jimmy Nardello is a sweet one that might work.
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Old November 2, 2019   #3
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Thanks, FarmerShawn!
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Old November 2, 2019   #4
bower
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I don't know about drying on the vine, but Petit Marseillais is a sweet yellow pepper with thin walls, fairly prolific, nice taste.
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Old November 2, 2019   #5
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Thunder Mountain dries well on its own though I roast it a bit before grinding into powder.
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Old November 2, 2019   #6
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Cambuci (C. baccatum) - not on the plant, but after harvest
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Old November 2, 2019   #7
clara
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High Fly Pepper (from the Philippines) and Apache
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Old November 2, 2019   #8
shule1
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Thanks for all the suggestions, everyone! =)
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Old November 3, 2019   #9
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Tobasco, cayenne, Sriracha for hots.
Jimmy Nardello for sweet?
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Old November 3, 2019   #10
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Shi★★★★o.
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Old November 5, 2019   #11
Hunt-Grow-Cook
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shule1 View Post
I'm looking to discover more peppers (hot and sweet) with thin walls (such that they dry quickly). I haven't found a terrible lot of them, actually, but I've grown a fair number of peppers. These are the ones with thin wqlls I've grown that come to mind:
* Aji Habanero (C. baccatum—not to be confused with Habaneros, which are C. chinense)
* Ring of Fire (Baker Creek's version)
* Orange Carbonero (not super thin, but they dry on the plant)

Ideally, they should be thin enough that they'll dry on the plant in a semi-arid area if you let them. Note that Ring of Fire doesn't seem to do this, but it dries quickly post-harvest.

Ideally, the peppers won't be huge (but they will be prolific). Huge peppers take longer to dry, in my experience. Ideally, they'll have lots of flavor.

For baccatum suggestions I'd consider Aji Lemon or Aji Pineapple, pretty much the same in my garden, the pineapple being slightly larger peppers. Both very thin walled. Criolla Sella would be another baccatum to consider. Carbonero definitely has thinner walls because of its Bhut (ghost pepper) genetics. A lot of peppers with Bhut or Bih Jolokia in them will be thinner walled, so many to choose from. I've got seeds for a cross of Bih Jolokia and Sugar Rush Peach that has fairly thin walled peppers as well. Paper Lantern Habanero would be another C. Chinense with thin walls and is red.
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Old November 6, 2019   #12
dorota
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Hungarian have thin walled spice peppers, which are expected to dry on the vine. In English they are called "paprika pepper". One of my favorite is sweet pepper Kalorez. My growing season is shorter than in Hungary, so I dry them at home.
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Old November 6, 2019   #13
shule1
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Thanks again for the feedback, everyone!

@Hunt-Grow-Cook I'm particularly interested in what you said about Paper Lantern. Any idea how it tastes, by chance?
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Old November 6, 2019   #14
Hunt-Grow-Cook
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shule1 View Post
Thanks again for the feedback, everyone!

@Hunt-Grow-Cook I'm particularly interested in what you said about Paper Lantern. Any idea how it tastes, by chance?
Pretty standard Habanero flavor and heat. Maybe slightly less floral and a little more fruity than some chinense. I enjoy them. Plants can be very productive. We are lucky to carry them in our local Co-Op every year and I just made a batch of fermented hot siracha using these and red Fresno chilies. Again, very thin walled.
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Old November 7, 2019   #15
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Bishop's cap pepper, mine was called "Christmas Bell." The flesh is sweet, walls are thin, and there's heat in the inner membranes & seeds. They are quite prolific! They're listed as 5,000-15,000 SHU. If you carefully remove all membranes & seeds, you could use them as sweet peppers. Cute little odd-shaped peppers about 1 1/2" in diameter. They're good green or red. I have seeds if you want them.
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