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Old 4 Days Ago   #1
sjamesNorway
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Default Info:Bulgarian Triumph, Batyanya, Rozovye Gryozy?

Bulgarian Triumph: I've seen a lot of praise for this variety, and I'm considering growing it in my greenhouse. Does anybody know if it's heat tolerant?

Batyanya: Has anybody grown this one? All I know is what I found about it at nikitovka.com - “Early (96-105 days), high-yielding Heirloom variety. Indeterminate tomato, plant grows 150-190cm (60-75in.) height. Heart-shaped, crimson with pink, big, very delicious tomatoes, weight 350-600g (12-21oz.). Long fruiting period and resistant to late blight.” I'm wondering if it's early enough to do well outside in our cool summer. If anyone's grown it, I'd be interested in your opinion, also about taste.

Rozovye Gryozy: All I know about this one is what Tatiana has written -

"Indet. plants with regular leaf wispy foliage. Large pink oval-shaped fruit up to 11 oz. Outstanding sweet flavor, juicy." And it's "early". I'm also considering growing this outside. Any opinions?


Steve

Last edited by sjamesNorway; 4 Days Ago at 10:12 AM.
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Old 4 Days Ago   #2
carolyn137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjamesNorway View Post
Bulgarian Triumph: I've seen a lot of praise for this variety, and I'm considering growing it in my greenhouse. Does anybody know if it's heat tolerant?

Batyanya: Has anybody grown this one? All I know is what I found about it at nikitovka.com - “Early (96-105 days), high-yielding Heirloom variety. Indeterminate tomato, plant grows 150-190cm (60-75in.) height. Heart-shaped, crimson with pink, big, very delicious tomatoes, weight 350-600g (12-21oz.). Long fruiting period and resistant to late blight.” I'm wondering if it's early enough to do well outside in our cool summer. If anyone's grown it, I'd be interested in your opinion, also about taste.

Rozovye Gryozy: All I know about this one is what Tatiana has written -

"Indet. plants with regular leaf wispy foliage. Large pink oval-shaped fruit up to 11 oz. Outstanding sweet flavor, juicy." And it's "early". I'm also considering growing this outside. Any opinions?


Steve
Steve, I only know the first one, Bulgarian Triumph.

http://tatianastomatobase.com/wiki/Bulgarian_Triumph

From Tania's link you can see I got it from Dennis Sherwood back in 2003 and have grown it many times since then for SSE listings and seed offers. Dennis was doing a huge project on determining the internal pH of many tomato varieties. I don't know where he got it from, but he sent me the seeds he had left over,about 200 varieties.

And yes,if anyone has my heirloom book , as Tania pointed out,it's on page 80.

I then looked in the current 2017 SSE Annual, and see folks from

Mi
OH
WI
WI listing it and all liking it very much.

The problem that started with the 2017 SSE Annual is that no more have they listed whose hands the seeds went through until the current person grew it and indicated who they got it from.

Thank heavens that Tania still does that as you can see from the link to her page.

Heat tolerant in a greenhouse? Maybe in the winter?Could work, but in the summer how hot does it get in your greenhouse?

As in how how heat tolerant do you want it to be?

Carolyn
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Old 4 Days Ago   #3
sjamesNorway
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Thanks for the info. Carolyn. I do have your book. I sometimes have trouble keeping the temperature from going into the 90s. Couilles de Taureau, NAR and Indian Stripe, for example, kept on producing while others dropped blossoms.

Steve
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Old 3 Days Ago   #4
carolyn137
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Originally Posted by sjamesNorway View Post
Thanks for the info. Carolyn. I do have your book. I sometimes have trouble keeping the temperature from going into the 90s. Couilles de Taureau, NAR and Indian Stripe, for example, kept on producing while others dropped blossoms.

Steve
Even where I am in Zone 5 in upstate NY,it will get to 90 or above,that's F not C, but at 90 plus for several days the pollen is destroyed, denatured,and if it's also humid the pollen wil lclump making it less produtive.

Once the temps go back down new buds and blossoms appear and onward it goes.

But what I can't remember is when I was growing it so often what the weather was like.

And I'm sure you'll also look into the other two varieties that you mentioned as well.

Carolyn
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Old 3 Days Ago   #5
sjamesNorway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
Even where I am in Zone 5 in upstate NY,it will get to 90 or above,that's F not C, but at 90 plus for several days the pollen is destroyed, denatured,and if it's also humid the pollen wil lclump making it less produtive.

Once the temps go back down new buds and blossoms appear and onward it goes.

But what I can't remember is when I was growing it so often what the weather was like.

And I'm sure you'll also look into the other two varieties that you mentioned as well.

Carolyn


Fusion_power wrote this in a thread about the effect of temperatures-

"92°F = This is the temp at which pollen starts clumping and blossoms begin to drop.

70°F (21C) to 92°F (33C) = This is the goldilocks zone. Tomatoes grow prolifically, flowers set readily, plants need maximum fertility in the soil. The high end of this range is optimum for spread of several foliage diseases."


It seldom gets over
92°F in the greenhouse here for several days, and it always cools off at night. In my experience some varieties tolerate heat better than others, and heat tolerance is often mentioned in descriptions of some varieties. I assume this is due to genetic variation in the susceptibility over time of the pollen and flowers.


Steve
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Old 3 Days Ago   #6
carolyn137
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjamesNorway View Post
Fusion_power wrote this in a thread about the effect of temperatures-

"92°F = This is the temp at which pollen starts clumping and blossoms begin to drop.

70°F (21C) to 92°F (33C) = This is the goldilocks zone. Tomatoes grow prolifically, flowers set readily, plants need maximum fertility in the soil. The high end of this range is optimum for spread of several foliage diseases."


It seldom gets over
92°F in the greenhouse here for several days, and it always cools off at night. In my experience some varieties tolerate heat better than others, and heat tolerance is often mentioned in descriptions of some varieties. I assume this is due to genetic variation in the susceptibility over time of the pollen and flowers.


Steve
Steve,you do know that Darrell lives and gardens in Alabama where it is both Hot and Humid.

If it were me I wouldn't compare what he sees with what you experience in Norway,either outside or in a greenhouse..

Especially when he says pollen clumping come first, at least for him.

Carolyn
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Old 3 Days Ago   #7
sjamesNorway
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolyn137 View Post
Steve,you do know that Darrell lives and gardens in Alabama where it is both Hot and Humid.

If it were me I wouldn't compare what he sees with what you experience in Norway,either outside or in a greenhouse..

Especially when he says pollen clumping come first, at least for him.

Carolyn
True, Carolyn, humidity is very seldom a problem here, but varieties that others describe as "heat tolerant" have done much better than others in my greenhouse, so I find the term useful.

Steve
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Old 2 Days Ago   #8
Lindalana
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Batyana, very good, early, productive, more sweet than acidic. I am not sure if it is heirloom though, I think it is recent OP?
Rozovye gryozu- not that early if I remember, more mid, good sausage shape fruit, tasty, wispy plants. Productive enough to plant again but I have only grown it once.
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Old 2 Days Ago   #9
Tormato
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Bulgarian Triumph - In the words of Comic Book Guy (The Simpsons), "Best. Red. Saladette. Ever."

Smaller tomatoes have always done better in hot weather, for me. It looks like BT is smaller than the other two varieties.
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Old 2 Days Ago   #10
Labradors2
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I grew BT this year and thought that it tasted pretty darned good too

Linda
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Old 1 Day Ago   #11
sjamesNorway
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Default Thank you all for the input

Bulgarian Triumph sounds good, so I'll try it in the greenhouse, and see for myself how it does in the heat. Batyanya looks like a good one to try outside.

I've decided to only grow early varieties outside, after I got very little production last year during a very cool summer, from all except one variety, so Vozovye Gryozy is out.

Note: The one variety which produces lots of delicious fruit here, even in a bad summer, is Sakharnyi Pudovichok ("Sugary Pounder"). Tatiana describes it as midseason, but "very early for such a large fruited tomato". Highly recommended!

Steve

ps: Sakharnyi Pudovichok did not like the heat when I tried it in the greenhouse!

Last edited by sjamesNorway; 1 Day Ago at 10:28 AM. Reason: ps
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Old 15 Hours Ago   #12
SharonRossy
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I grew BT last year when it was a much hotter summer than this past one and it was prolific. Pumped out tons of tomatoes. Good flavor as well.
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Old 7 Hours Ago   #13
greenthumbomaha
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I grew BT last year when it was a much hotter summer than this past one and it was prolific. Pumped out tons of tomatoes. Good flavor as well.
Yes, grow it! I grew it in my partners acreage garden. It got over run my the tomato next to it, and I wasn't able to jump the row to harvest it. Same conditions as you experienced Sharon, much hotter than normal all summer. I could see the long rows of really ripe tomatoes calling out but arms were to short to grab. Second the taste with The Simpsons; very tasty out of the gate.

I have very few seeds but hope to grow again next year. It was destined to be a nifty fifty <sniff>.

- Lisa
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Old 2 Hours Ago   #14
sjamesNorway
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Default Yes!

BT sounds good to go in the greenhouse!

Steve
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