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Old February 8, 2011   #1
nangisha
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Default What happen to my tomato, Is this late blight???.

We got rainy season for a years ( thanks to weather anomaly ) and this cherry tomato got rain almost every day . I am beginner so really don't have a clue what is this. I am not treated it with any thing because I wanna grow it pesticide free. Does any one know what it is, share please....

Thanks.
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Old February 8, 2011   #2
dice
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It looks more like Alternaria or Early Blight than Late Blight.
(Late Blight usually kills the whole plant in a week, so it is
kind of hard to miss on a plant with an advanced case.)

You can look at pictures of tomato leaf diseases at these
URLs:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/p...emsolver/leaf/
http://vegetablemdonline.ppath.corne...omLeafKey.html
http://vegdis.cas.psu.edu/VegDisases.../tomatodis.htm

This document has pictures of nutrient deficiency symptoms:
http://4e.plantphys.net/article.php?ch=5&id=289

You could try cutting off all of the diseased leaves and then
spraying the plants with a 6% Clorox solution (laundry bleach
in water; one measure of laundry bleach for 16 and 2/3rds
measures of water). If more leaves die after spraying, that
simply means that they were already infected, even if the
symptoms were not obvious yet. That should keep the disease
from spreading to leaves and plants that are not yet infected.
You might give a light spray to the soil underneath them, too,
since the leaves may be getting it from splash-up from the
rain.

Another option is to use a hydrogen peroxide spray instead of
laundry bleach:
http://www.using-hydrogen-peroxide.c...-peroxide.html

In either case, you probably cannot save the already diseased
leaves. If you cut off the diseased leaves, spray, and nothing
happens (the disease seems to still be there on new leaves),
then it may be a soil mineral deficiency (those usually include
other symptoms as well as leaf symptoms, one way to tell them
from bacterial or fungal leaf diseases). It may also mean that
the disease is being blown in on the wind from infected weeds
somewhere nearby, or that insects are carrying it.
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Last edited by dice; February 8, 2011 at 06:31 AM. Reason: clarity
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Old February 8, 2011   #3
Stepheninky
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Is the plant dieing from the bottom up or all over it and is it affecting the fruits as well?

Also how long has the plant been infected?

If you can please take a close up pic of both sides of a leaf and the fruit. It will help people to better ID what the issue is.

I am sure with that much rain and humidity it is probably a fungus based issue.

The bleach solution might work though it looks pretty advanced.

you can also in the future use tepung soda pengembang kue or as we call it baking soda before the plants get this bad this is considered organic but needs to be used before it spreads to control it

Baking soda spray is reputed to be effective to treat late blight, early blight and other fungus problems. Mix 1 tbsp. baking soda and 2 1/2 tbsp. vegetable oil in one gallon of water. After mixing, add one half tsp. of dish soap. Spray the tomato plant once a week, coating the leaves and stems. Spray after the hottest sun of the day is over.
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Last edited by Stepheninky; February 8, 2011 at 06:59 AM.
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Old February 8, 2011   #4
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The dilute Clorox spray will probably get rid of the disease or at least slow it down significantly; but if the whole plant including new growth is affected then the spray could kill the plant. If it is some kind of fungus the Clorox spray will kill the affected leaves within a couple of days and if you have some plants just starting to show the symptoms it should save them.
I always spray all of my tomatoes with the dilute clorox spray during times of heavy and persistent rains. Just make sure you use a bleach mix that has 5 1/2 % to 6 % sodium hypochlorite when adding it to the water. If it has more or less you will have to adjust your mixture accordingly. Also make sure you spray late in the day.
Whatever that is on your plants it looks quite advanced and it may be too late for anything to help. Good Luck.
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Old February 8, 2011   #5
nangisha
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stepheninky View Post
Is the plant dieing from the bottom up or all over it and is it affecting the fruits as well?

Also how long has the plant been infected?

If you can please take a close up pic of both sides of a leaf and the fruit. It will help people to better ID what the issue is.

I am sure with that much rain and humidity it is probably a fungus based issue.

The bleach solution might work though it looks pretty advanced.

you can also in the future use tepung soda pengembang kue or as we call it baking soda before the plants get this bad this is considered organic but needs to be used before it spreads to control it

Baking soda spray is reputed to be effective to treat late blight, early blight and other fungus problems. Mix 1 tbsp. baking soda and 2 1/2 tbsp. vegetable oil in one gallon of water. After mixing, add one half tsp. of dish soap. Spray the tomato plant once a week, coating the leaves and stems. Spray after the hottest sun of the day is over.
Its usually there is something white on the leaf like powder but sticky to the leave. Its usually appears after the fruit set and its start from the lowest leave and goes up. Even the new sucker leaf got it too.

I think there is nothing else to do at thats stage because I harvest it all today but do you think its stay in the soil. Is it good idea to compost the soil in container to compost bin. I had new tomato but the lowest leave also got this. They were in the same location (roof). But in others location don't get it (porch/veranda).

I had baking soda at home I think I will try it.

Thanks
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Old February 8, 2011   #6
Stepheninky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nangisha View Post
Its usually there is something white on the leaf like powder but sticky to the leave. Its usually appears after the fruit set and its start from the lowest leave and goes up. Even the new sucker leaf got it too.

My guess is its a type of White powdery mold or mildew (its still is a fungus though) The symptoms of the most common one are a white powdery residue, then the leaves will have yellow patches instead of green, then brown and die.

I think there is nothing else to do at thats stage because I harvest it all today but do you think its stay in the soil. Is it good idea to compost the soil in container to compost bin. I had new tomato but the lowest leave also got this. They were in the same location (roof). But in others location don't get it (porch/veranda).

I had baking soda at home I think I will try it.

Thanks
Its usually there is something white on the leaf like powder but sticky to the leave. Its usually appears after the fruit set and its start from the lowest leave and goes up. Even the new sucker leaf got it too.

My guess is its a type of White powdery mold or mildew (its still is a fungus though) The symptoms of the most common one are a white powdery reside, then the leaves will have yellow patches instead of green, then brown and die.

If its in containers some fungus can live in the soil for 3 years or so. So no I would toss the soil and the plants in the trash. Soak or clean the pots really well with bleach (memutihkan or pengelantang / kelantang in Indonesian) before you reuse them.

Then next time when you are growing and its really rainy or humid just use the Baking soda, or bleach treatment (I have used both (not at the same time) as a fungicide and both work) That should slow it down or prevent it next time. Usually by the time it gets to where you notice it, It's a lot harder to control.
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Last edited by Stepheninky; February 8, 2011 at 11:18 AM.
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