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Old February 14, 2010   #1
silas
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Default San Cocho

Ive been looking for a potato like the ones I used to eat in Antioquia in San Cocho - small round about 1-1.25 inch diameter, yellow flesh, nutty, special for this dish and Ive never seen outside the Andes -- suggestions on US sources anyone?
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Old February 14, 2010   #2
ruet
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Aside from cities with a large Colombian immigrant population — or smuggling them out of Colombia yourself, you will have a hard time finding "papa criolla" anywhere outside of Colombia.

Assuming you can get your hands on some, they apparently (according to my friends and family from Colombia) have some fairly unique cultivation requirements to get a decent yield, different from normal potatoes. In Colombia there are no seasons, so climate varies by altitude. (Higher = colder).

I don't know much about potatoes — what I have heard from friends and family in Colombia is that they need a steady 60-70º climate to really shine. Don't let that discourage you though. Good luck!

Last edited by ruet; February 14, 2010 at 02:54 PM. Reason: edit
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Old February 15, 2010   #3
Tom Wagner
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Papa criolla
The potato with this scientific name Solanum phureja ….which is very common in Colombia has a translation in English as simple yellow potato, also known as :Papa Amarilla, which in some cases actually refers to a variety of potatoes, mostly it is a class. Yema de Huevo is a classic example for one of these varieties. The classic Papa Amarilla cannot be grown below 3,000 ft. elevation.

Silas wondered if the potatoes found in Antioquia could be found in the USA.
Well…..yes and no. Let me explain a few things first.

Quote:
In Antioquia, the potato crop is less seasonal and more evenly distributed across the year, but with some concentration of planting in March and also November
I am thinking Yema de Huevo fits the cycles of production locally.

Quote:
Varieties
In keeping with Colombia's partial transition toward a more commercialized potato industry, varieties are commonly Solanum tuberosum ssp. tuberosum, as opposed to Peru and Bolivia, characterized by many small, non-commercial producers more commonly based on varieties of S. tuberosum ssp. andigena (Huarte 2004). The decrease in area planted to andigena varieties of S. tuberosum, as well as varieties of Solanum phureja, has apparently been underway for several decades. In the early 1970s, about forty percent of the potatoes planted in Colombia were native varieties (Alvarado 1974), many of which were being replaced because of long durations to maturity (six to seven months) and low yields. As of 2000, approximately thirty native varieties were being cultivated, of which ten were of commercial importance.
I know for a fact that growers in the USA don’t want to fool with potatoes that are six to seven month maturities and low yields…they are after three month potatoes with high yields. Short day potatoes from Colombia just do not perform well in our long day production cycles. I did grow them fairly well as a fall winter crop in southern California however.

Quote:
Native varieties nevertheless exhibit characteristics of value. Strong resistance to Potato Leafroll Virus (PLRV) has been reported in Solanum phureja, a cultivated diploid potato species with a center of genetic diversity in the south of Colombia. S. phureja seems to have been selected from S. stenotomum by Andean farmers for its rapid maturity and lack of dormancy after harvest. The variety known as yema de huevo ("egg yolk," because of its characteristic round yellow tubers) accounts for nearly ten percent of the total potato crop in Colombia, though generally cultivated as a secondary crop
You have no idea how annoying it is to have potatoes break dormancy too soon. They often even start to sprout before the plant dies down and certainly shortly after harvest. My breeding work is just the opposite of the Colombians……I am crossing many phureja clones back to stenotomum to restore the dormancy genes without having to rely exclusively on crossing to tuberosum and andigena clones.

Quote:
Although very few farmers in Colombia work directly with certified seed (partly due to the strict standards of ICA), the "formal system" has actively introduced new varieties which farmers are adopting. From 2001 to 2005, eleven varieties were released, including several of the species S. phureja (Criolla Colombia, Criolla Latina, and Criolla Paisa). These new varieties are offering alternatives to those which have dominated the market for several decades, but which are susceptible to Late Blight (e.g. Parda Pastusa, Monserrate, and Capiro) or are otherwise less desirable to farmers and processing firms.
Now I have lots of clonal material from Colombia such as Monserrate and Capiro and are introgressed into my breeding program. The Criolla Coloumbia and Latina are not available to me yet and I do not know if they have the classic flavor of Yema de Huevo. I have the Yema de Huevo bred into many of my varieties …the closest one would be my Skagit Valley Gold. I only have a few tubers for replanting this year but I have lots of TPS. Some of my TPS has Yema de Huevo as a g.g.g randparent and the flavors should re-emerge in the seedlings.

Only a relative few potato farmers in Colombia are sufficiently productive and of economic scale to participate in the market for processed potatoes (mostly snacks) directed by several domestic and transnational firms. In some cases, firms establish contractual relationships with growers which can stipulate not only prices to be paid, but any of a number of other factors, such as quantities to be produced, varieties, size, and other quality factors.
So whether or not Yema de Huevo is showing up in processed foods in one I need to explore. But the fastest way to find out if the potato Silas is looking for is to follow some links provide here.

Whole Yellow PotatoImported from Colombian http://www.amigofoods.com/delfrpacr28o.html
Papa Criolla Asada
Papas Criollas are absolutely delicious and in Colombia we cook them in many different ways. Although this recipe entails roasting papas, fried papas are a very popular street food that is sold in paper bags by street vendors. In the United States I buy these potatoes frozen. You can find them in the Latin aisle at the supermarket or online in Amigosfood.com
Attractive shots of these potatoes…..
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...colombiana.jpg shows a picture of fried papas
http://www.mycolombianrecipes.com/wp...riolla-019.jpg
Shows a bag of roasted potatoes
http://euroandinasl.com/images/PICAD...%20CRIOLLA.gif shows the frozen potatoes that can be purchased

For some adventurous soul besides Silas , I would suggest calling the number for Amigo Foods down in Miami, Florida and ask about the latin foods. I think a 26 oz. jar of the tiny potatoes is like $4 before shipping. You can find out more by clicking on the link above and ordering by internet. I wish someone besides myself would order some. Hint..
Just to let folks know how serious I am about introducing new clonal material to the public someday is this list of Solanum phureja lines from mostly Colombia...
Narino, Colombia origin which is further south than Antioquia


Quote:
PI 310490* (phureja)
YELLOW RED
PI 310493*(phureja)
YELLOW
PI 225667*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225667* (phureja)
YELLOW - PURPLE RING
PI 225673*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225677*(phureja)
DEEP PURPLE FLESH - PURPLE MOTTLED ON WHITE FLESH
PI 225686*(phureja)
WHITE - PURPLE RING
PI 225686*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225688(phureja)
YELLOW - PURPLE SPLASH
PI 225689(phureja)
YELLOW - PURPLE SPLASH
PI 225689*(phureja)
YELLOW - PURPLE
PI 225689(phureja)
BRIGHT YELLOW
PI 225689*(phureja)
DEEP PURPLE - DARK YELLOW
PI 225693* (phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225693*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225694*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225705*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 225710*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 320355*(phureja)
DEEP PURPLE
PI 320355(phureja)
YELLOW SKIN - DEEP PURPLE
PI 320370(phureja)
YELLOW - RED CENTER
PI 320370*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW - RED PHLOEM
PI 320373*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 320373*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 320377*(phureja)
DARK PURPLE SKIN - YELLOW FLESH
PI 320377*(phureja)
DARK YELLOW
PI 320377(phureja)
DEEP PURPLE
PI 320379*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 320379* (phureja)
DEEP YELLOW - RED RING
PI 320379*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW - RED RING
PI 320387(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 320390(phureja)
PURPLE CENTER
PI 320390*(phureja)
YELLOW
PI 320391*(phureja)
DARK YELLOW
PI 320391*(phureja)
DARK YELLOW
PI 320391*(phureja)
DEEP PURPLE CENTER
PI 320391*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 498171*(phureja)
DEEP YELLOW
PI 498171*(phureja)
I used this group in breeding last year and will do so again in 2010. An increase of these need to made to ascertain the flavors also. These potatoes are sprouting like crazy but could still grow if somebody wants to try a few. I have a few extra tubers of most. Most of these are derived from accessions collected 60 years ago and reflect even more primitive characteristics than YdH.

There are so many sprouts on some of these that one could treat them like sweet potato and grow rooted slips off of each sprout.


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Old February 20, 2010   #4
silas
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Thanks Tom -- for the detailed info --if you need a taster let me know.
Meanwhile as Im in the frozen north this sounds like a long shot
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Old July 28, 2010   #5
citygirl2countrygirl
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Default What would papa sabanera translate to?

Hello,

I'm not familiar with potatos but I have been eating sancocho and ajiaco since I was a little girl. Unfortunately, because the US doesn't sell fresh papa criolla or sabanera, the dishes never taste the same. I've resigned myself to cooking with dutch yellow potatoes when I need the papa criolla, but what about the sabanera potato? What is good alternative?

Thanks!
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Old July 28, 2010   #6
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Sancocho and ajiaco? Sorry, but I don't have any first hand experience with those dishes, however.....Both Sancocho and Ajiaco are Colombian soups. I forgot where I found this source, but..
Quote:
There are recipes for ajiaco, but without guasca and the specialcreole potato” (which falls apart while cooking, making the soup thicken) it is hard to properly replicate this recipe if you’re not in Colombia.

Quote:
"El Ajiaco" : Chicken soup thickened with three variety of potatoes (papa sabanera, papa criolla, papa pastusa and hojas de guascas = wild leaves) served with young corn, cream and avocado.
Quote:
SANCOCHO DE GALLINA
A typical soup from Cali, Sancocho de Gallina takes the meaning of chicken soup to another level. This hearty soup contains chicken, plantains, yucca, cilantro, potatoes, and plenty of other tasty ingredients. Sancocho is widespread throughout the country, with countless regional variants.
Of the varieties available here in the States, I would suggest GERMAN BUTTERBALL as a potato that falls apart when completely cooked. If you wish to try this variety out I could send a one pound box for $5 postpaid as a research project.

I know I answered a similar question on this topic back in February but I think adding to the discussion is important.

What does Sabanera stand for in English...

plains woman is a rough translation of Sabanera
Quote:
papa sabanera
(en Colombia) la papa sabanera tiene corteza morada y es indispensable para los asados
meaning reddish purple potato good for roasting.

I wanted to find descriptions of the varieties used in these recipes in Colombia and found these sites:
http://www.bogota-dc.com/food/papas.htm
Quote:
The Sabanera (red table potato), can be identified by its reddish purple colour with dark yellow spots. After brushing the skin its reddish colour really should stand out. The flesh is yellow and hard and it has a generally rounded shape.
It is an annual crop in the months of June and July and can be found in the region of Boyaca, Colombia.
This potato must be stored in a dry & dark place in order to keep for several months. It is mainly used, because of its firmness, to make potato chips and french fries. It can be replaced with red table potatoes.

Quote:
The Paramuna (baking potato), also called PASTUSA or PARDA, has a yellow skin without spots. The flesh is also yellow and soft, very starchy, and it is generally shaped like an oval. There can be up to 3 harvests a year. When cooked it dissolves very easily, for that reason is an essential base for the ajiaco.
It can also be used to make baked potatoes. It can be replaced with baking potatoes. Its price is much lower than the sabanera.


Quote:
The Criolla (pickled potato) has a skin colour that is yellow earth. Its flesh is also yellow, soft, and it is round and small in size. The crop has to be used very fast because it spoils easily.
This potato is an essential part of the ajiaco and should not be peeled. Its origin comes from the central part of Colombia and is unique. It is also cheaper than the sabanera.
In North America it is known as "Native Potato". You can find the real "Criolla" in cans as Pickled Potatatos in some Latin American supermarkets.
http://www.bogota-dc.com/food/images/papas.jpg shows the three varieties

Quote:
Criolla is cultivated at an altitude of 6,500 feet and is always roasted or boiled in its skin.
Sabanera is one of the most popular Colombian varieties suitable for roasting, baking, or steaming.
Use papa Sabanera from the plains of Cundinamarca and Boyacá, two states in Colombia. Papa Paramuna from the high plateau, papa Pastusa from Pasto, and papa Criolla a small and yellow potato that disolves in the soup giving it its consistency.
http://www.bogota.gov.co/portel/libreria/php/x_frame_detalle.php?id=40239



Quote:
There are about 30 different types of potatoes in Colombia, of which about 10 are popular. The most known and used are Criolla (S. Phureja), Sabanera
(ssp andigena) and Pastusa (which comes from Sabanera) (ssp andigena). These are all native potatoes that resulted from cloning projects done on traditional potatoes. The last one is the variety with the most commercial value in the Bogota market, growing at least 3,000 meters above sea level.

Criolla is a small, round, yellow type of potato. It is soft and starchy. In traditional cuisine they are fried whole and served with a lot of salt with “fritanga” which is a popular dish which combines “chorizo” (type of pork sausage), blood sausage and “chicharron” (pork scratchings). This dish is found around Colombia on street stands and is usually eaten without silverware.

One of the new and more gourmet manners in which this potato is being served by the new Colombian wave gastronomy is as mashed potatoes. Usually, mashed potatoes are prepared with Pastusa or Sabanera, but many chefs that specialize in Pacific Coast cuisine are serving this new type of yellow mashed potatoes as a side dish with fish.

Sabanera potatoes are grown in the province of Boyaca and it is greatly appreciated for its texture, dry consistency and flavor. It is most used at chicken broasteries, which are very popular in Bogota and its surroundings. Any ‘respectable’ Colombian eats broasted chicken and potatoes. It is the Colombian variety of a baked potato. It is also usually served at BBQs with guacamole or home made aji (which is a type of spicy sauce made of water, tomato, onion, coriander and spicy peppers).

Another commonly used type of potato is ‘Pastusa’ which is similar to ‘Sabanera’ but is much softer, it crumbles when it is baked so it is perfect for soup. Because of its consistency it is also used in international dishes like gnocchi, which is a pasta dish that comes from Genova but is eaten around the world. It has a difficult preparation so it is not easy to find but many Bogota, Italian restaurants serve this delicacy.
I have many andigenum potato accessions but not Sabanera. I could get true seed of it and try them out to find one or more that look, cook, and taste similar. If I find the time I could request this line....
PI 243416 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigenum - CCC 250 - Cauca, Colombia --
SABANERA : LOCALNAME Made available in 1957 TPS only


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3066/...086bdce62d.jpg for a picture of Sabanera, Criolla and Pastusa Potatoes


http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VqeIakJhmx...h/IMG_7620.JPG picture of Pastusa in market place
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_VqeIakJhmx...h/IMG_7623.JPG picture of criolla

Like I said, I don't have Sabanera but I could request clones collected in the same location as Sabanera circa 1957. I could make this a project for collection and breeding. Interesting names.

Collected in: Cauca, Colombia donated 1957-1984
PI 498176 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum –No Name
PI 243414 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - GUATA
PI 498175 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum –No Name
PI 247355 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - GUATA PURACENA
PI 247353 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - PASTUZA
PI 247351 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigenum - GUATA MALVACENA
PI 247348 Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - GUATA ROJA
PI 243423 Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - GUATA BLANCA
PI 243422 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - PAMBA GUATA
PI 243421 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigenum - CARETA
PI 243420 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - GUATA BLANCA
PI 243418 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. Andigenum - CARETA
PI 243416 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigenum - SABANERA
PI 243415 - Solanum tuberosum subsp. andigenum - GUATA ALMIDONA

So many of my previous collections of andigenum are from Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina, however, I will take a quick sampling of those later this year to see what the cooking qualities are compared to what I know now about Sabanera.
PI 280952 is one that I have used extensively in breeding. It is from Bolivia, and the one seedling line of that is being increased where I should have enough to spare some for eating. I planted a few just a short while ago in order to get the bulking of the potatoes occurring during the shorter days of September and early October in order to mimic the short days of Bolivia.


In any event, I will go through about twenty accessions of andigenum and the many seedling clones of those to see what I have for the flavor and cooking types. If I don't respond to this topic later on this summer/fall please give me a nudge.
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