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-   -   pablano-ancho peppers (http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=45693)

clkeiper July 26, 2017 08:31 AM

pablano-ancho peppers
 
I learned something new today... Pablanos are green and fresh and Anchos are red and dried. same pepper. never knew that. I guess that means I can save the seeds from ancho's and grow them maybe?

Worth1 July 26, 2017 12:10 PM

Yes you can and not all Ancho are red some are dried green.
Ancho means wide.
Worth

My Foot Smells July 26, 2017 02:01 PM

The poblano (Capsicum annuum) is a mild chili pepper originating in the state of Puebla, Mexico. Dried, it is called ancho or chile ancho, from the Mexican Spanish name ancho ("wide") or chile ancho ("wide chile").Stuffed fresh and roasted it is popular in chile rellenos poblanos.

greenthumbomaha December 31, 2017 04:51 PM

I think this will be as far as I go with a hot pepper this year. Does anyone get a really hot pepper from this or are they truly uniformly mildly hot? I want to minimize my mistakes with hot peppers in recipes that I want mild.

I had a row of misc "Fooled You" type Jalapenos and they got mixed in with the hots after harvest. Maybe a purple Jalapeno grown far away so it will stand out. Or should the ancho be my "hot" choice?

- Lisa

Worth1 December 31, 2017 05:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha (Post 676202)
I think this will be as far as I go with a hot pepper this year. Does anyone get a really hot pepper from this or are they truly uniformly mildly hot? I want to minimize my mistakes with hot peppers in recipes that I want mild.

I had a row of misc "Fooled You" type Jalapenos and they got mixed in with the hots after harvest. Maybe a purple Jalapeno grown far away so it will stand out. Or should the ancho be my "hot" choice?

- Lisa

The Pablano or as you call it Ancho can be very tricky.
From the same plant you can get a mild pepper and later in the year get one that burns your lips off.
To me an ancho will always be a dried pablano, ancho meaning wide.
Most of the time when I buy them they are like leather or jerky and I eat them out of hand whole for a snack.
You cant go wrong with this pepper in my opinion.
Worth

rhines81 December 31, 2017 05:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greenthumbomaha (Post 676202)
I think this will be as far as I go with a hot pepper this year. Does anyone get a really hot pepper from this or are they truly uniformly mildly hot? I want to minimize my mistakes with hot peppers in recipes that I want mild.

I had a row of misc "Fooled You" type Jalapenos and they got mixed in with the hots after harvest. Maybe a purple Jalapeno grown far away so it will stand out. Or should the ancho be my "hot" choice?

- Lisa

I haven't had a hot jalapeno all year, they all seemed so mild - home grown or store bought. Anyhow, here is a list of peppers with their Scoville score. A jalapeno is 5,000-6,000 usually, the bell pepper is 0. Anaheims are also a great choice for a flavorful pepper with only a tiny bit of heat.

Guajillo Pepper
5000
Cajun Belle Pepper
4000
Cascabel Pepper
3000
NuMex Big Jim
3000
Anaheim Pepper
2500
Pasilla Pepper
2500
Poblano Pepper
1500
Peppadew Pepper
1200
Italian Long Hot Pepper
1000
Cubanelle Pepper
1000
Aji Dulce
1000
Mexibell Pepper
1000
Holy Mole Pepper
800
Santa Fe Grande Pepper
700
Banana Pepper
500
Pepperoncini
500
Shi★★★★o Pepper
200
Bell Pepper
0

wildcat62 December 31, 2017 05:39 PM

Our favorite is poblano


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