Tomatoville® Gardening Forums

Tomatoville® Gardening Forums (http://www.tomatoville.com/index.php)
-   Herbs (http://www.tomatoville.com/forumdisplay.php?f=75)
-   -   Buying Herbs? (http://www.tomatoville.com/showthread.php?t=35213)

EBCIII February 23, 2015 09:52 PM

Buying Herbs?
 
I know it may be late in the year to buy my Herbs in seed form. I have a local Nursery that sells Herb Plants. I also know these will be higher in price. I would like Basil, Thyme, and Oregano maybe even Lavender. By buying plants and keeping my count down to three or maybe 4 Am I looking at more than say a couple bucks per? Beale.

Cole_Robbie February 24, 2015 01:32 AM

Basil is a fast grower. You've probably still got time to start it from seed. The rest are slow growers and you probably want plants.

If you like cilantro, it grows fast, too.

EBCIII February 24, 2015 08:26 AM

[QUOTE=Cole_Robbie;453009]Basil is a fast grower. You've probably still got time to start it from seed. The rest are slow growers and you probably want plants.

If you like cilantro, it grows fast, too.[/QUOTE]



Thank you for that! I also love Cilantro! Beale.

shelleybean February 24, 2015 09:11 AM

I just started my basil last week, Beale. Now is the perfect time. The other herbs you mentioned are perennials so if you buy the plants, around here you'd only need to buy them once. I overwinter mine outside and they're fine. Oregano and Thyme would just the one time expense. Basil is grown as an annual so all you need is a packet of seed.

clkeiper February 24, 2015 10:49 AM

everything but the lavender is easy to start from seed and much cheaper. Splurge by spending the savings on the lavender. You will be fortunate to find any of them for less than 4.00 each for a decent sized pot.

I start all the rest by filling a flat and sprinkling the seeds over the surface, spritz with water, cover them with plastic so they don't dry out and keep them out of direct sun so they don't' cook and they will be germinated in less than a week, most likely.

Direct seed your cilantro wherever you want it to grow. It does not perform after being transplanted. It will go straight to flower. Every week or two toss a few more seeds out to germinate. Once you see a flower start to develop there isn't much to work with for culinary use. You can use the flowers in place of the leaves. they taste just like the leaves.

EBCIII February 24, 2015 12:00 PM

Thanks! To Both of you!! Lavender is just so Pretty and smells so Good. In NC we had a Lavender Farm. They even made Lavender Ice Cream! Beale.

Worth1 February 24, 2015 12:41 PM

All parts of cilantro AKA coriander are edible the seed and even the roots.:)


Worth

Starlight February 24, 2015 03:30 PM

Beale... Message me with your addy and I'll send you some seed of different types of Lavenders.

Worth... Very interesting about being able to eat the Cilantro roots.

EBCIII February 24, 2015 07:07 PM

[QUOTE=Starlight;453131]Beale... Message me with your addy and I'll send you some seed of different types of Lavenders.

Worth... Very interesting about being able to eat the Cilantro roots.[/QUOTE]

Thank you so Much!! PM sent, Beale.!

barefootgardener February 24, 2015 08:01 PM

I can send you some culinary thyme seeds. Very easy to grow from seed. Mine germinated in five days. PM me your address and I will send out this week.

P.S I think I have some Organic Cilantro left. I will send some along with the thyme.
I start some Cilantro seed inside for early plants in pots. It does just fine. Then I direct seed more in late spring .

Ginny

EBCIII February 24, 2015 08:20 PM

Thank You also!! Beale!

Rairdog February 24, 2015 08:54 PM

These are my views based on what I need for a steady supply year round.

Basil is easy and can be started late inside or out. Grows good under tomato's

Thyme can be difficult to start but easily over wintered from established plant.

Rosemary is also difficult for me to start. Once established it is easily overwintered in window.

Sage is easier in the garden.

Cilantro is easy and somewhat invasive if you let it seed. I direct sow in the garden and bend it out over the edge to collect coriander seed.
Fennel is great direct sown in patches by themselves so I can collect seed.

Dill is also great direct sown in patches so it is ready for pickles.

Oregano is also somewhat invasive and needs it's own controlled space outside.

Parsley grows good in patches under tomato's

I use all these to flavor homemade sausage, soups and in all my cooking. You just need to keep track of your personal usage so your in a steady supply. So I might by a thyme, rosemary and oregano if the seeds don't take or I know in the end it will save me the effort.

EBCIII March 5, 2015 06:24 PM

[QUOTE=barefootgardener;453194]I can send you some culinary thyme seeds. Very easy to grow from seed. Mine germinated in five days. PM me your address and I will send out this week.

P.S I think I have some Organic Cilantro left. I will send some along with the thyme.
I start some Cilantro seed inside for early plants in pots. It does just fine. Then I direct seed more in late spring .

Ginny[/QUOTE]


I got your Seeds!! Thank you so much!! I had to go buy a bit more potting soil! I have them all planted now in a tray. Thanks again! Beale.

Starlight March 5, 2015 07:01 PM

Beale... Your lavender seeds should be arriving tomorrow or Sat, hopefully.

barefootgardener March 5, 2015 09:33 PM

[QUOTE=EBCIII;454991]I got your Seeds!! Thank you so much!! I had to go buy a bit more potting soil! I have them all planted now in a tray. Thanks again! Beale.[/QUOTE]

Your welcome!! Happy to hear they made it safely. Hope they all germinate well for you. I have transplanted mine and the little thyme seedlings smell so good!! :)

Ginny

EBCIII March 11, 2015 08:19 AM

[QUOTE=Starlight;454996]Beale... Your lavender seeds should be arriving tomorrow or Sat, hopefully.[/QUOTE]


I got your seeds yesterday!! Thank you so much!! Beale.

Starlight March 11, 2015 11:40 AM

Your welcome Beale. Just remember not to over water Lavenders or they will rot on you. They don't like wet feet. I learned that lesson the hard way. : )

clkeiper March 11, 2015 11:47 AM

[QUOTE=Starlight;456197]Your welcome Beale. Just remember not to over water Lavenders or they will rot on you. They don't like wet feet. I learned that lesson the hard way. : )[/QUOTE]
Any other tips on getting lavender to start from seed? I have tried and tried and the germination rate is so poor I am beginning to wonder what am I doing wrong? I have tried them off heat, on heat, in peat, in potting mix, in different brands, in DE... the best I got was one seed packet germinated fairly well in those jiffy peat pellets off heat, but even that seemed to be a fluke. I haven't gotten anything to be consistent. Thanks.

Fred Hempel March 11, 2015 12:47 PM

The advantage of buying plants (in addition to quicker harvests) is that when you buy plants you know exactly what the herb will be like. You can smell it and see the parts you will eventually harvest.

This is particularly important for lavenders, mints and thyme.

EBCIII March 11, 2015 12:58 PM

[QUOTE=Starlight;456197]Your welcome Beale. Just remember not to over water Lavenders or they will rot on you. They don't like wet feet. I learned that lesson the hard way. : )[/QUOTE]


I just put them in the tray with a bit of water. If they come up I will be very happy! If not? I did it wrong and may have to buy some. Heck I am not even sure I will have the space to plant them.

My beds may be full with just Tomatoes, Beale.

Starlight March 11, 2015 01:34 PM

[QUOTE=clkeiper;456201]Any other tips on getting lavender to start from seed? I have tried and tried and the germination rate is so poor I am beginning to wonder what am I doing wrong? I have tried them off heat, on heat, in peat, in potting mix, in different brands, in DE... the best I got was one seed packet germinated fairly well in those jiffy peat pellets off heat, but even that seemed to be a fluke. I haven't gotten anything to be consistent. Thanks.[/QUOTE]

Lavenders are not easy to start. Starting them from seed requires a lot patience. So like Fred mentioned if you want instant results it is better to buy the plants and actually take cuttings and root more.

To start from seed, I get them little tiny plastic soufee cups you see at the big box store in the paper supplies. The cocktail size about one ounce. I use a screwdriver or heat and poke a hole in the bottom.

In a bowl I will take a handful or what I feel I need of just straight vermiculite and just barely moisten it. I moisten it will a mix of water and hydrogen peroxide. You just want it barely damp, just so you know there is a touch of moisture in the vermiculite. because it can anywhere from two to 6 weeks depending upon cultivar for it to germinate and if you have it too wet your seeds will rot before they even have a chance to grow.

I fill the little soufees up with the vermiculite, drop one seed in each little pot, right on the top. Than I take just a very thin, and I mean thin layer of dry vermiculite over it and give it two quick little mist sprays of more of the hydrogen/peroxide water.

Than I make a small tag from cut up blinds, so that it sticks up about an inch to an inch and a half above the top of the pot. Place all the little pots in a sealed plastic gallon baggy and put someplace where it is warm, but not super hot. About 60-70F and keep lights on it 24/7 til germination.

Because it takes so long for germination some times, I will open the baggy up for a minute about once a week and let some fresh air in and than reclose. If you can't see through the top of your baggy than you have too much moisture and I would pull the cups out, let them dry a bit and put into a new baggy.

They do take work, but Lavender is worth it. I trying to get my hands on some of the yellow to try. The only one I wouldn't recommend is Pink Ellegance. The flowers are so tiny you can barely see them and it rambles all over, not so nice to look at , nor a strong fragrance.

clkeiper March 11, 2015 01:49 PM

Thanks. Maybe I am keeping them too moist. I am not looking for instant. I grow to sell at markets and I have a roadside stand. this has been my biggest challenge for starting from seed. I have a greenhouse and it is just sitting on benches... but not doing much, I have it in plastic trays with covers on them. Maybe I will cut some slits/holes in them and cover with a paper towel to see if they will do something. I had some germinate last year, but as soon as I planted it it died. I don't know if it was the potting mix, too moist, too dry, too whatever, but it died. I will say it was Scotts potting mix in the green bag. Someone gave it to me and I thought I would try it. I wouldn't ever buy it after trying it , though. I think it will be fine to dump in the high tunnel, but not plant plants in pots in it.

Worth1 March 11, 2015 02:10 PM

I would really like to have one of my beds full of French lavender.

But no way I could afford to buy all of those plants.

Worth

Starlight March 11, 2015 02:31 PM

You and me both Worth. Ya know I wouldn't be opposed to you buying a field of them and gifting them all to me. :yes:

That is a dream I am trying to work on one seed at a time, though this year some of my plants are big enough to root a few cuttings. A friend has been to Hawaii and says they have some of the biggest most beautiful and fragrant fields of Lavender there and it is well worth the trip to Hawaii just to go visit the Lavender fields. Maybe someday.

Clkeiper... If you want for market. I think it would be worth buying online if they don't sell in your stores a True Lavender at least and hack it all up into cuttings and you could probably root them a whole lot faster and have for market in a year or two.

Also a word of warning, that if you are pregnant there are alot of studies out and ask a doc, that you should not be around or handling Lavender as it may affect an unborn child.

I am trying Heather for the first time this year. I hope it is going to be easier than Lavender.

clkeiper March 11, 2015 03:56 PM

I tried cuttings. They are as hard as seeds. No worries here for any unborn or future generations.... My children are all graduated and I am not needing any more, but thanks for the warning. It isn't one I have ever heard of.

drew51 March 11, 2015 04:16 PM

I bought four different lavender plants last year. I think I already mixed them up, as to what is what? One was for culinary uses. One has pink flowers! They were small but all grew really fast! I need to prune them! I buy a lot of plants online all the time!
I have three fruit trees coming, 1 currant, 4 blackberries, 2 basil hybrids, Cuban Oregano and some potato tubers.
The fruit trees are a Weeping Santa Rosa plum. a Satsuma plum, and Nadia a natural hybrid of a Japanese plum and a sweet cherry.
I don't think you can buy seed of Cuban Oregano? It's not really an oregano, but a plant that can be used like oregano. I want it for my Tex-Mex dishes. Coleus amboinicus var.
I bought the variegated type. taste is same as non-variegated. I will start new plants in the fall and overwinter indoors. The Basil hybrids are
GREEK COLUMNAR BASIL and AFRICAN BLUE BASIL

clkeiper March 11, 2015 05:35 PM

Drew, I had cuban oregano last year and it is very citrusy. I am not sure if that is the flavor you want for tex-mex or not. Just remembering how clean and fresh it smelled, I don't think I would try it in tex-mex unless someone told me to. I didn't get mine to winter over, so I am hoping my friend did and will share some with me again.

Worth1 March 11, 2015 05:41 PM

[QUOTE=clkeiper;456290]Drew, I had cuban oregano last year and it is very citrusy. I am not sure if that is the flavor you want for tex-mex or not. Just remembering how clean and fresh it smelled, I don't think I would try it in tex-mex unless someone told me to. I didn't get mine to winter over, so I am hoping my friend did and will share some with me again.[/QUOTE]

In Mexico they use a lot of lime and citrus in some of their hot sauce.
I can buy it here in town.
It is very good we even have Lime and chilli tortilla chips.

[url]http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=7&ved=0CDQQFjAG&url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FPlectranthus_amboinicus&ei=QLcAVZLMEoOdNoDugfgN&usg=AFQjCNF5cZSZSJXcCo4GSqn7IX4WBwxOew&bvm=bv.87920726,d.eXY&cad=rja[/url]

Worth

clkeiper March 11, 2015 06:04 PM

It doesn't really remind me of lemon or lime specifically. just fresh clean and citrusy. Silly sounding description, I know, but it just doesn't strike me as tex-mex and I love our mexican restaurant here in town, it just doesn't "go" with the cuisine I get there. Maybe I should ask for something different the next time i go. Like maybe # 39 or # 56... etc. Just pick a number and try it whatever "it" is.

Worth1 March 11, 2015 06:10 PM

[QUOTE=clkeiper;456294]It doesn't really remind me of lemon or lime specifically. just fresh clean and citrusy. Silly sounding description, I know, but it just doesn't strike me as tex-mex and I love our mexican restaurant here in town, it just doesn't "go" with the cuisine I get there. Maybe I should ask for something different the next time i go. Like maybe # 39 or # 56... etc. Just pick a number and try it whatever "it" is.[/QUOTE]

Sounds like it would be good on Tacos Al Pastor.(meaning in the shepherds style)
[url]http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2&ved=0CCkQFjAB&url=http%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FAl_pastor&ei=cbwAVairIJPmgwTZhICYAg&usg=AFQjCNF7vVXcg48KENeae1V29VMrJ5JXMA&bvm=bv.87920726,d.eXY&cad=rja[/url]

Worth


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:52 PM.


★ Tomatoville® is a registered trademark of Commerce Holdings, LLC ★ All Content ©2019 Commerce Holdings, LLC ★